Entrepreneurship in the Classroom

As an educator, we want to equip you with engaging ways to help empower students to consider entrepreneurship among their future options.

Resources, Articles and Lesson Plans

Jay Starts a Business

Jay Eagle takes students on an entrepreneurial adventure to start his own bird business in this classroom interactive.

Entrepreneurship Lessons and Resources

From elementary to high school, access these lesson plans and resources to help students explore the world of entrepreneurship.

Black Women Business Startups

Teachers can access resources to help students understand opportunity occupations as an option to consider for their career paths.

Youth Entrepreneurship Guide

This guide helps place a higher emphasis on entrepreneurship throughout the education system.

Building Entrepreneurship Ecosystems in Communities of Color

This guide provides an overview of inclusive entrepreneurship ecosystem building for communities of color.

Video Resources

Learn from entrepreneurs across the region in these short videos about their journeys and businesses.

Webinars and Video Resources

Professional Development for Educators

Browse these on-demand webinars to help equip you on a variety of topics, including entrepreneurship.

21st Century Careers Student Webinars

Expose students to a variety of career paths in this video series where they will hear from local leaders about their careers.

Fed Opportunity Occupations Video Series

Within the Federal Reserve there are several opportunity occupations; learn more about each position in this short video series.

Entrepreneurship in Action

In this video series, meet and learn from entrepreneurs across the region; discussion questions for students are included.

Connect With Us

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Bite Size Economics

Brainstorm a list of careers or jobs that are associated with taxes (such as accountant). Research one of these careers to learn about the education qualifications, income level and demand for the job.

Bite Size Economics

Learn about federal income taxes, FICA, W-4 and W-2 forms in Know your dough Lesson Two: "W" is for Wages, W-4 and W-2: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/paycheck/IYP_lesson2.pdf.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss the growing threat of identity theft. Ask students to write tips for consumers to follow in keeping their identity safe. (Example: Memorize your Social Security number so you won't need to carry your card with you.)

Bite Size Economics

You have opened a new video game store and hired five full-time employees. If starting salaries are $8.50 an hour and all employees work a 40-hour week, how much should you budget for employee salaries weekly? ($1,700)

Bite Size Economics

As entrepreneurs invent new products, they often make former products obsolete, or out of date and no longer used. An example of this would be the typewriter, which is now rare because of computer word processing. This concept is called "creative destruction." Ask students to brainstorm and discuss other examples of creative destruction due to new inventions.

Bite Size Economics

Follow the lesson plan for "Abraham Lincoln and the Five-Dollar Note" to learn why Lincoln is portrayed on this note and the features of the redesigned $5 bill: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/Lincoln$5Note.pdf.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the three types of resources, giving examples of each:Natural - gifts of nature used to make goods and services;Human - workers who make goods and provide services;Capital - goods made and used to provide other goods and services.Hand out magazines and have students find pictures of each type of resource. Use images to create a class resource poster with three columns labeled for the different resource types.

Bite Size Economics

Download the St. Louis Fed's Econ Ed Mobile App to explore the cost of using credit. Learn how interest is calculated, and then use the Credit Cost Calculator to see how interest ratesaffect monthly payments and the total cost of a purchase. http://bit.ly/11zNwSM

Bite Size Economics

Justin's assets are a $250 bike, a $1299 computer, and $582 in savings. His liabilities are $475 owed on a loan for the computer and $138 owed to his mom. Add Justin's assets and subtract his liabilities from the total. What is Justin's net worth? ($2131 - $613 = $1518)

Bite Size Economics

Discuss the meaning of this quote: "An opportunity cost is an opportunity lost."

Bite Size Economics

Trivia: The Federal Reserve Act was signed by President Woodrow Wilson in 1913. The average annual income that year was $800.

Bite Size Economics

Estimate the cost: If you want to buy an item for $9.50 with a 9% sales tax, is $10 enough money?

Bite Size Economics

Many students think about running their own business as adults. Ask students to brainstorm types of businesses that interest them. Invite a local business owner from an area of interest to speak to the class about his/her experiences. Prepare for the speaker by making a list of interview questions related to running a business.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the first three principles, discussing incentives as things that influence the behavior of people. Discuss the concepts of opportunity cost and monetary cost. Provide the following scenario: You are trying to decide whether to start college right after graduation or wait and work for a year before enrolling. Create a table listing the opportunity costs and monetary costs, as well as the benefits of both choices. Make your final decision and explain your reasoning.

Bite Size Economics

Using the Chicago Board of Trade (www.cmegroup.com), follow the prices of basic commodities used in producing food, such as corn, wheat and meat products. Report results at the end of the month and make a prediction on food prices for the next month.

Bite Size Economics

Compare the prices of store-brand items you need (milk, soap, clothing, etc.) versus the name-brands you want. Are the name brand items worth the price? Give reasons to back your opinion.

Bite Size Economics

Read Meet Kit: An American Girl by Valerie Tripp. Use the children's literature lesson from the St. Louis Fed to role play the effect that unemployment and reduced spending can have onpeople's lives during a recession. http://bit.ly/12Bxppn

Bite Size Economics

Explain a market economy as an economy that operates by voluntary exchange between buyers and sellers in a free market not planned or controlled by government. Ask students to research this and other types, such as traditional and command economies: http://www.councilforeconed.org/resources/lessons/whateconisabout-sample.pdf. Discuss the differences in the three economies and why a market economy works best in our country.

Bite Size Economics

What does money mean to you? Purchasing power? Security? Freedom? Brainstorm ideas and then create a collage showing what money can represent.

Bite Size Economics

Why do bank panics often lead to recessions or larger financial upheavals?

Bite Size Economics

Make up a rap about regretting a buying decision (buyer's remorse) and wishing you had purchased your opportunity cost instead. Perform it for the class.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the topic of credit and discuss the responsibilities of credit use. Discuss the rule of thumb that credit should not be used for purchase of basic needs (such as groceries, utilities and rent). Make two lists of goods and services. Include items that are good purchases to make with credit on one list, and on the other list detail items you do NOT want to purchase using credit.

Bite Size Economics

Look closely at a one-dollar bill. What symbols and words do you see that connect this bill with the Federal Reserve?

Bite Size Economics

Ask students to work with a partner on the following income/expenses problem: You want to convince your family to buy a new computer to replace the outdated one at home. Create a visual that gives family members ideas on how to cut monthly expenses (such as food, clothing and entertainment) in order to save income for the purchase.

Bite Size Economics

Go to the following website to learn about McDonald's: http://www.aboutmcdonalds.com/mcd/our_company/mcd_history.html. Look through the timeline and share three risks the company took as it became an established business.

Bite Size Economics

Why have other countries adopted mobile payments faster than the United States? Find out in the Atlanta Fed's podcast The Future of Mobile Payments. Write a description of a mobile payment option you think would work best in United States. http://bit.ly/11YTIOu

Bite Size Economics

Develop a list of economic, social and environmental costs and benefits of developing a new city park. Develop another list for the development of a large chain store like Wal-Mart in the same area. How are the costs and benefits the same or different?

Bite Size Economics

Research three universities you may want to attend. Evaluate each one using a decision grid with these criteria: size, location, fields of study and tuition cost.

Bite Size Economics

Write and perform a skit that explores the concept of fair trade, which aims to help producers in developing countries receive higher prices for their goods and improve social and environmental standards. Include advantages and disadvantages to fair trade policies.

Bite Size Economics

Research the purposes of the World Trade Organization (WTO). Hold a mock debate where two countries use the WTO as a forum to discuss their disagreements concerning a trade policy.

Bite Size Economics

The threat of war pushed the Federal Reserve Banks to open early because of bank panic fears. How else can war affect the economic health of a country?

Bite Size Economics

Through a story and activities, Piggy Bank Primer introduces students to economic concepts such as saving and budgeting: http://www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/piggy_bank_primer/StudentSavingBudgeting.pdf.

Bite Size Economics

Create a consumer profile, such as a 20-year-old college athlete, and make a collage of products or services using newspaper, magazine ads and/or computer-generated images that would appeal to that type of consumer.

Bite Size Economics

Create a rap or song titled, "Invest in Yourself." Include all the ways to invest in your human capital, such as more education, training and practicing to gain experience, and taking care of your health. Perform your verses for the class.

Bite Size Economics

Make a collage of magazine ads that would appeal to consumers urging them to save money, possibly by living greener.

Bite Size Economics

Cut out or draw pictures of three of your top wants. Estimate how much they cost and determine a budget or way to save for these items. Present your wants and savings plan to the class.

Bite Size Economics

Use the Fifty Nifty Card Teacher Resource Guide's "Word of the Week" activity to integrate the concept of scarcity into reading, language and art: www.federalreserveeducation.org/resources/fiftynifty

Bite Size Economics

Discuss that not all organizations are required to pay taxes to the government. These include schools, churches and not-for-profit groups, such as scouts, animal protection agencies and charities. Ask the class for reasons why these organizations are tax-exempt and whether they think this is fair to everyone else. Have students write a letter to the school newspaper explaining their opinion.

Bite Size Economics

Write and perform a rap highlighting one or two of the principles you've discussed from the Guide to Economic Reasoning. Give examples explaining the principles in your lyrics.

Bite Size Economics

Resource Trivia: What two fabric resources are used to make paper currency? (linen - 25%; cotton - 75%)

Bite Size Economics

Read The Pickle Patch Bathtub by Frances Kennedy. Use the St. Louis Fed's children's literature lesson to discuss the topic of developing a plan to achieve your savings goal: http://bit.ly/12LedV1

Bite Size Economics

Learn about market equilibrium, or the point at which there is no shortage or surplus of a good or service, by watching the third episode of the Economic Lowdown Video Companion Series at: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/video_podcasts.cfm.

Bite Size Economics

The following statements are common descriptions of credit. Discuss each example and use one as a topic for a creative story.Credit is your reputation for financial responsibility.Credit is the time allowed for payment for something sold on trust.Credit is a source of revenue for financial institutions.Credit is NOT more money; it is "tomorrow's" money.

Bite Size Economics

Use the following questions to interview three people about their spending habits as consumers: Where do you shop the most? Are you more concerned with price or quality? Is customer service important to you? Compare interview results with a classmate.

Bite Size Economics

Wants and needs may vary depending on culture. Research wants and needs around the world and compare and contrast them with your own community.

Bite Size Economics

Look at the Federal Trade Commission's website: www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/pubs/consumer/credit/cre34.shtm to learn about the Fair Credit Reporting Act. Discuss why consumers should order a copy of their credit report yearly.

Bite Size Economics

Before buying clothes or shoes, consumers should consider several features, such as price, quality, fit, style and comfort. Discuss and rank these features with students to see which ones are most important to them in making a purchasing decision.

Bite Size Economics

Your credit report is like a report card. It is used to calculate your credit score. You can receive one free credit report every twelve months from each of the nationwide credit bureaus-Equifax, Experian, and Transunion-by visiting www.annualcreditreport.com.

Bite Size Economics

Would you want to bank at an unregulated bank? Give a two-minute oral presentation explaining your position.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the concepts of imports and exports. Learn the top three imports and exports of your state by visiting: www.census.gov/foreigntrade/statistics/state/data/index.html. Discuss possible reasons why these resources made the top of the list. Choose a neighboring state and do the same research. Create two Venn diagrams comparing both states' imports and exports.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss the meaning of the following quote: "Budget: a mathematical confirmation of your suspicions." - A.A. Latime

Bite Size Economics

Money doesn't grow on trees, but it can grow. Watch No Frills Money Skills episode 1 from the St. Louis Fed. Develop a table showing how saving $1,000 at 3% annual interest can compound your savings over a 6-year period. http://bit.ly/11OJ5Pt

Bite Size Economics

The interest on your savings account has increased from 1% to 2.5%. How much interest would your $100 deposit earn in a year (without compounding) at each percentage? ($1; $2.50) Explain how receiving interest can be an incentive to save.

Bite Size Economics

Write a short essay explaining the reasoning for tariffs on imports to the United States.

Bite Size Economics

Assume the identity of a superhero or a credit villain in the Kansas City Fed's role play Professor Finance and Fed Boy Meet the Catastrophe Clan to learn about the use and misuse of credit and how the CARD Act protects consumers. http://bit.ly/13jzWzX

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the concept of market clearing price: where buyers and sellers agree on a price to reflect supply and demand; also called an equilibrium price. Discuss the market clearing prices (MCP) of tickets to a concert. What can you assume if the concert is sold out? (MCP is too low.) If few tickets are sold? (MCP is too high.) If you were a concert promoter, what criteria would you use to set ticket prices?

Bite Size Economics

Visit the Federal Reserve Board of Governor's website to find tips for improving your credit score. Make a poster to share this information with your classmates. http://1.usa.gov/140Qjnb

Bite Size Economics

The St. Louis Fed offers instant message simulations on a variety of personal finance topics. Try one and learn about how to open a bank account. http://bit.ly/14C0qf1

Bite Size Economics

Use magazine pictures to create a collage of future wants. Develop a budget tha