Entrepreneurship in the Classroom

As an educator, we want to equip you with engaging ways to help empower students to consider entrepreneurship among their future options.

Resources, Articles and Lesson Plans

Jay Starts a Business

Jay Eagle takes students on an entrepreneurial adventure to start his own bird business in this classroom interactive.

Entrepreneurship Lessons and Resources

From elementary to high school, access these lesson plans and resources to help students explore the world of entrepreneurship.

Black Women Business Startups

Teachers can access resources to help students understand opportunity occupations as an option to consider for their career paths.

Youth Entrepreneurship Guide

This guide helps place a higher emphasis on entrepreneurship throughout the education system.

Building Entrepreneurship Ecosystems in Communities of Color

This guide provides an overview of inclusive entrepreneurship ecosystem building for communities of color.

Video Resources

Learn from entrepreneurs across the region in these short videos about their journeys and businesses.

Webinars and Video Resources

Professional Development for Educators

Browse these on-demand webinars to help equip you on a variety of topics, including entrepreneurship.

21st Century Careers Student Webinars

Expose students to a variety of career paths in this video series where they will hear from local leaders about their careers.

Fed Opportunity Occupations Video Series

Within the Federal Reserve there are several opportunity occupations; learn more about each position in this short video series.

Entrepreneurship in Action

In this video series, meet and learn from entrepreneurs across the region; discussion questions for students are included.

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Bite Size Economics

Discuss the resources used in the production of chocolate (cocoa beans, sugar, milk) and the producers of each resource. Ask students to choose any product, make a list of resources used in its production, and count the number of producers involved in the process. Can anyone find a product that has more than five producers?

Bite Size Economics

Learn what happens when the price of an asset becomes artificially high in Recession Lesson: Asset Bubbles, available at: www.kansascityfed.org/publicat/education/teachingresources/RecessionLesson-AssetBubbles.pdf.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss the correlation between a country's resources and what goods they export and import. Have students choose countries, research their major resources, exports and imports, and share their findings. Discuss which countries might make good trading partners.

Bite Size Economics

A class of 28 students earned popsicles. The teacher bought 2 boxes of popsicles, with 12 in each box. How many more popsicles does the teacher need to avoid a scarcity in her classroom? (4 more)

Bite Size Economics

Invite a bank manager to visit as a guest speaker. Create interview questions that ask about the education, skills and responsibilities that are needed for his/her position.

Bite Size Economics

Why is money deducted from your paycheck and where does it go? Learn how to read a paystub, discuss different methods for receiving wages, and discover ways to get more from your paycheck with the Kansas City Fed's Putting Your Paycheck to Work resources. http://bit.ly/17nFIa0

Bite Size Economics

Trade barriers are costs that raise the price of traded products. Examples are tariffs, import and export quotas, and embargoes. In groups, research and make charts to compare and contrast these barriers.

Bite Size Economics

Would you want to bank at an unregulated bank? Give a two-minute oral presentation explaining your position.

Bite Size Economics

Learn why the regional structure of the Federal Reserve System is important to understanding the economic conditions in all regions of the country in the Atlanta Fed's video The Fed Explains Regional Banks. http://bit.ly/14A3ASh

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the first two principles and the concept of opportunity cost (see above). Ask students to imagine they are trying to decide if they want to try out for a sports team. Have them list the costs and benefits of playing on a team. After comparing the costs with the benefits, have each student make a final choice and explain their decision.

Bite Size Economics

Draw pictures that represent financial words and write the definitions of the words on the opposite side. Save these financial flashcards to use for review. Suggested words: bank, save, deposit, withdrawal, interest, emergency fund, short-term goal, long-term goal.

Bite Size Economics

Focus on and discuss human capital: the skills, talents and education that people possess. Discuss how improving human capital through education and training correlates with increasing income. Ask students to research and share education levels and average income of chosen careers by going to the Bureau of Labor Statistics website to look at the Occupational Outlook Handbook: www.bls.gov/oco.

Bite Size Economics

Track expenses for a week and then create a spending plan to make sure your expenses don't exceed your income.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the concept of market clearing price: where buyers and sellers agree on a price to reflect supply and demand; also called an equilibrium price. Discuss the market clearing prices (MCP) of tickets to a concert. What can you assume if the concert is sold out? (MCP is too low.) If few tickets are sold? (MCP is too high.) If you were a concert promoter, what criteria would you use to set ticket prices?

Bite Size Economics

Create a trophy that could be awarded as a classroom incentive for the best singer, athlete or leader in the group.

Bite Size Economics

Would you accept a cow as payment? Learn about the four characteristics of money and evaluate various forms of money, including cows, that were used as currency in earlier times by reviewing Kansas City Fed's lesson Early Forms of Money. http://bit.ly/1a8sTip

Bite Size Economics

Use GeoFRED from the St. Louis Fed to examine economic data for your state. How does your state's unemployment rate today compare with what it was in May 2009? http://bit.ly/13R3yWW

Bite Size Economics

Ask the class to brainstorm ways they could spend $10. List ideas and ask them to narrow it down to one, since the class has only one $10 bill. When there is disagreement on which one, discuss that the scarcity of the money to be spent forces us to make choices.

Bite Size Economics

If U.S. exports to China are worth $8 billion, and U.S. imports from China are worth $34 billion, what is the total trade amount? ($42 billion) What is the trade deficit? ($26 billion)

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the definitions for save and spend. Describe short-term savings goals as items students want that will require saving for several months. Ask students to choose an item as a savings goal, estimate the cost of the item and figure the amount they would have to save weekly to reach their goal. Have students share their goals and savings plans with the class.

Bite Size Economics

Write a short essay explaining the reasoning for tariffs on imports to the United States.

Careers

Operations and Administration: Our operations and administration teams enable the Bank to meets its mission and achieve its business objectives. Positions in Operations and Administration include administrative assistants, operating clerks, customer service representatives and facilities technicians.

Bite Size Economics

Why is a bank holiday not something to celebrate, and why did President Franklin D. Roosevelt establish a national one in 1933? Find out in the Boston Fed's Closed for the Holiday: The Bank Holiday of 1933. http://bit.ly/11I1W4r

Bite Size Economics

Research your Federal Reserve Bank or Branch Board of Directors members, including the industries and states they represent. Write a short essay explaining why each board member's input is important to understanding the regional economy.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the concepts of income and expenses. Give students the following scenario: Your family has decided to take a summer vacation to Disney World. You are responsible for earning money to spend on park passes and souvenirs during the trip. Brainstorm three ways to earn money and estimate approximately how much income you might receive from each activity. Write a letter to your parents explaining your fundraising plans.

Bite Size Economics

Develop a classroom currency to use as pay for completing projects, following rules and helping others. Discuss income earned from these tasks each week and plan a future action to spend this income at the end of the quarter, semester or year.

Bite Size Economics

Read Rock, Brock and the Savings Shock by Sheila Bair. Illustrate the benefits of saving by using two clear jars, one for Rock and one for Brock, and adding or removing beans whenever the boys save or spend money.

Bite Size Economics

Starting your own business as an entrepreneur has opportunity for profit and possibility of loss. Brainstorm a list of potential businesses to start and then list possible profits and losses for one of those businesses. Debate whether the business risks are worth the rewards.

Bite Size Economics

Draw a picture that shows farmers trading equipment, crops or labor with each other. Explain how this trade situation helps farmers and their families.

Bite Size Economics

Read The Goat in the Rug by Charles Blook and Martin Link. Use the children's literature lesson to discuss the topic of resources in the story: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/GoatintheRug.pdf

Bite Size Economics

Divide students into two teams. Hold up pictures of natural, human and capital resources and take turns asking teams to identify the type of resource each is. Teams score points for correct answers.

Bite Size Economics

Research the characteristics of a savings account, certificate ofdeposit, money market account and savings bond. Using the scenarioof a short-term savings goal, decide which one would be the bestplace for your money and explain your reasoning.

Bite Size Economics

Hand out various grocery receipts to students with the sales tax blacked out. Discuss that some states tax only non-food items, while others tax both food and non-food. Have students calculate the sales tax for both situations.

Bite Size Economics

Create a rap or song titled, "Invest in Yourself." Include all the ways to invest in your human capital, such as more education, training and practicing to gain experience, and taking care of your health. Perform your verses for the class.

Bite Size Economics

Write and perform a skit that explores the concept of fair trade, which aims to help producers in developing countries receive higher prices for their goods and improve social and environmental standards. Include advantages and disadvantages to fair trade policies.

Bite Size Economics

If U.S. exports to China are worth $8 billion, and U.S. imports from China are worth $34 billion, what is the total trade amount? ($42 billion) What is the trade deficit? ($26 billion)

Bite Size Economics

Discuss the meaning of this quote: "Henry Ford was right. A prosperous economy requires that workers be able to buy the products they produce. This is as true in a global economy as a national one." - John J. Sweeney

Bite Size Economics

What is the value of the largest note ever printed? ($100,000) Which president was on the bill? (Woodrow Wilson)

Bite Size Economics

Go to the following website to learn about McDonald's: http://www.aboutmcdonalds.com/mcd/our_company/mcd_history.html. Look through the timeline and share three risks the company took as it became an established business.

Bite Size Economics

Read The Pickle Patch Bathtub by Frances Kennedy. Use the St. Louis Fed's children's literature lesson to discuss the topic of developing a plan to achieve your savings goal: http://bit.ly/12LedV1

Bite Size Economics

Make a chart c