Entrepreneurship in the Classroom

As an educator, we want to equip you with engaging ways to help empower students to consider entrepreneurship among their future options.

Resources, Articles and Lesson Plans

Jay Starts a Business

Jay Eagle takes students on an entrepreneurial adventure to start his own bird business in this classroom interactive.

Entrepreneurship Lessons and Resources

From elementary to high school, access these lesson plans and resources to help students explore the world of entrepreneurship.

Black Women Business Startups

Teachers can access resources to help students understand opportunity occupations as an option to consider for their career paths.

Youth Entrepreneurship Guide

This guide helps place a higher emphasis on entrepreneurship throughout the education system.

Building Entrepreneurship Ecosystems in Communities of Color

This guide provides an overview of inclusive entrepreneurship ecosystem building for communities of color.

Video Resources

Learn from entrepreneurs across the region in these short videos about their journeys and businesses.

Webinars and Video Resources

Professional Development for Educators

Browse these on-demand webinars to help equip you on a variety of topics, including entrepreneurship.

21st Century Careers Student Webinars

Expose students to a variety of career paths in this video series where they will hear from local leaders about their careers.

Fed Opportunity Occupations Video Series

Within the Federal Reserve there are several opportunity occupations; learn more about each position in this short video series.

Entrepreneurship in Action

In this video series, meet and learn from entrepreneurs across the region; discussion questions for students are included.

Connect With Us

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Bite Size Economics

Write about a situation where a scarcity of food, money or time caused a problem, and how that problem was solved.

Bite Size Economics

Using the Chicago Board of Trade (www.cmegroup.com), follow the prices of basic commodities used in producing food, such as corn, wheat and meat products. Report results at the end of the month and make a prediction on food prices for the next month.

Bite Size Economics

In professional sports, a trade is a sports league transaction involving and exchange of players' contracts and/or draft picks. Have students research a sports trade in the NBA. Ask them to write a summary of the trade deal, including the advantages and disadvantages for the teams and/or players involved.

Bite Size Economics

View a short clip depicting a bank run from the movie, It's a Wonderful Life. Describe in a paragraph or two how depositors make poor decisions when they fear their bank is failing.

Bite Size Economics

Most states have created 529 plans to assist parents in saving for their children's future education. Have students research plans for the states in their region, including regulators, fees and internet options. Make a chart comparing neighboring states' 529 plans to your home state.

Bite Size Economics

Through a story and activities, Piggy Bank Primer introduces students to economic concepts such as saving and budgeting: http://www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/piggy_bank_primer/StudentSavingBudgeting.pdf.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the importance of weekly budgeting. Ask the class to use spending journals to track their purchases for a week. After journals are completed, students should share results for a class list of typical purchases and costs. Have students use the list to create a graph showing the areas where most purchases were made. Discuss ways to cut back on common buys to stay within their budgets.

Bite Size Economics

The start-up costs for your lemonade business includes $1.99 for the mix and $2.50 for the cups. If you sell each cup for $.60, how many cups do you need to sell to make a profit? (At least 8 cups.)

Bite Size Economics

Discuss fixed budget expenses (costs that remain the same) and variable expenses (costs that change). Write and perform a skit about college students living on campus who deal with these expenses.

Bite Size Economics

Choose a food product and ask students to brainstorm all of the natural, human and capital resources used to produce it. (For example: a candy bar - cacao beans, land, sun, water, sugar, milk, farmers, factory workers, assembly line, wrapper, etc.) Ask students to draw pictures or work together on a mural showing the production process.

Bite Size Economics

Visit a local bank or credit union and ask for some deposit slips. Use addition and subtraction and place value to practice filling out the slips

Bite Size Economics

View the American Currency Exhibit on the San Francisco Fed's website to explore currency from throughout our nation's history. Choose two bills from different eras and create a Venn diagram to compare and contrast bill symbols and features. http://bit.ly/1922F3l

Bite Size Economics

Play 20 Econ Questions or Econ Word Wiz (www.federalreserveeducation.org/resources/fiftynifty) using "producer" as one of the words.

Bite Size Economics

Economic growth occurs with an increase in productivity, which is the amount of outputs (goods and services) produced per unit of input (resources). Form an assembly line production of bookmarks in class, and then try to increase productivity with more efficient assembly techniques.

Bite Size Economics

Use the following questions to interview three people about their spending habits as consumers: Where do you shop the most? Are you more concerned with price or quality? Is customer service important to you? Compare interview results with a classmate.

Bite Size Economics

Have students draw a picture of their perfect vacation spot and include as many natural resources as possible.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the first two principles and the concept of opportunity cost (see above). Ask students to imagine they are trying to decide if they want to try out for a sports team. Have them list the costs and benefits of playing on a team. After comparing the costs with the benefits, have each student make a final choice and explain their decision.

Bite Size Economics

Watch the Economic Lowdown video on demand at: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/podcasts/economic_lowdown_video_2.cfm. Take notes on the six ways demand can change, giving an example for each. Create and present a skit showing the effects of supply and demand on the purchase of the newest cell phone, tablet or electronic device.

Bite Size Economics

If you had to choose a president for a new $200 bill, which choice would you select and which would be your opportunity cost? A) John Kennedy or B) Franklin Roosevelt. Have students discuss why they made their choice.

Bite Size Economics

Play "Econ Bingo" after reading directions, downloading bingo cards and sample money from the Fifty Nifty Econ Cards website: www.federalreserveeducation.org/resources/fiftynifty. Award $5 of money for each bingo during the game. Let winning students use their income to purchase incentives you have supplied.

Bite Size Economics

Display items manufactured by different countries, such as electronics, food products and clothing. Ask students to list the manufacturing country of each good. Have them locate these countries on a large blank world map, using one dot per manufactured good. Discuss reasons why some countries may have more dots than others.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss what economists mean when they say, "There is no such thing as a free lunch." How does this quotation relate to costs and benefits?

Bite Size Economics

Invite a bank manager to visit as a guest speaker. Create interview questions that ask about the education, skills and responsibilities that are needed for his/her position.

Bite Size Economics

Use the lesson plan and role play for "There's No Business Like Bank Business" to teach students the concept of how banks operate as a business: www.kansascityfed.org/publicat/education/teachingresources/No_Business_lesson.pdf and www.kansascityfed.org/publicat/education/teachingresources/Bank_Business_script.pdf.

Bite Size Economics

Working in groups, use restaurant menus to pick something to order and then calculate the sales tax on the order. Report the cost with tax and figure the tip using the tax rate as a guide.

Bite Size Economics

Explore the evolvement of the payment system by watching Chapter 5 of the Philadelphia Fed's video The Federal Reserve and You. Create a public service announcement highlighting the Fed's role in providing cash and electronic payment services. http://bit.ly/11dWBdQ

Bite Size Economics

List all the concepts from this planner on the board and number them. Number the sections of a beach ball similarly. Toss the ball to the class. Whoever catches it should explain the concept with the number closest to their right thumb. Repeat.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss this quote: "America's support for human rights and democracy is our noblest export to the world." - William Bennett

Bite Size Economics

What is the value of the largest note ever printed? ($100,000) Which president was on the bill? (Woodrow Wilson)

Bite Size Economics

Read Earth Day-Hooray! by Stuart Murphy. Use the children's literature lesson to discuss the topic of incentives in the story: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/EarthDayHooray.pdf

Bite Size Economics

After assigning classroom jobs (i.e. line leader, paper passer, etc.), provide students with the opportunity to trade jobs with others. After trading is completed, discuss the students' reasons for their trades, making a list of the costs and benefits of each job during the discussion.

Bite Size Economics

Read Saving Strawberry Farm by Deborah Hopkinson. Use the children's literature lesson from the St. Louis Fed to simulate a bank run. http://bit.ly/138xL3x

Bite Size Economics

Write a short story about your last five purchases and whether each was a want or a need. Include lessons you've learned about your spending habits and steps you can take in the future to purchase fewer wants and more needs.

Bite Size Economics

Draw a picture showing how a scarcity of natural resources can affect your daily life.

Bite Size Economics

What three federal agencies regulate banks? (Office of the Comptroller of the Currency-OCC; Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation-FDIC; and the Federal Reserve)

Bite Size Economics

Discover how the recession influenced the savings habits of consumers in the Recession Lesson: "The Silver Lining of the Economic Downturn" at www.kansascityfed.org/publicat/education/teachingresources/RecessionLesson-SavingsHabits.pdf.

Bite Size Economics

Read Uncle Jed's Barbershop by Margaree King Mitchell. Use the children's literature lesson to discuss starting a business at: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/UncleJedsBarbershop.pdf.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss Halloween and the practice of "trick-or-treating." Would this holiday be as much fun if the incentive of candy wasn't given out to trick or treaters? Would you still want to "trick-or-treat?" The "treat" can influence the behavior of kids. Take a survey to decide which type of treat is the best incentive: chocolate bars, fruit-flavored candy, gum and other choices.

Bite Size Economics

Certificates of deposit (CDs) are accounts that earn interest at a fixed rate over a set of time period and include penalties for withdrawing money early. Ask students to research interest rates of CDs at local banks. Make a class list of the best rates for each of the following CDs: 6 months; 12 months; 24 months; 36 months. Discuss why banks and credit unions pay higher rates for longer terms. Ask students if they would invest in a CD and why.

Bite Size Economics

Bring white elephant items from home (with a parent's signed note). After having an opportunity to trade items, explain the benefits of the trades made. Does everyone agree the trades were positive? If not, why not?

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the economic meanings of cost and benefit. Discuss that both are not always money-related, using the example of the costs and benefits of doing homework. Have students brainstorm a list of costs (losses) and benefits (gains) they experience by doing their homework. Take a vote to decide if the costs outweigh the benefits or vice versa.

Bite Size Economics

Use the Recession Lesson "Navigating the Fear of the Unknown" (http://kansascityfed.org/publicat/education/teachingresources/RecessionLesson-EconomicUncertainty.pdf) to learn about the role that economic uncertainty played during the recent recession for businesses and consumers.

Bite Size Economics

Justin's assets are a $250 bike, a $1299 computer, and $582 in savings. His liabilities are $475 owed on a loan for the computer and $138 owed to his mom. Add Justin's assets and subtract his liabilities from the total. What is Justin's net worth? ($2131 - $613 = $1518)

Bite Size Economics

Ask the class to brainstorm ways they could spend $10. List ideas and ask them to narrow it down to one, since the class has only one $10 bill. When there is disagreement on which one, discuss that the scarcity of the money to be spent forces us to make choices.

Bite Size Economics

Write and perform a skit showing the impact of incentives on changing poor cafeteria behavior.

Bite Size Economics

Consumer trivia: What is phishing? (a scam where internet fraudsters send spam or pop-up messages to lure personal information from unsuspecting victims.) Why should consumers be aware of this scam?

Bite Size Economics

Read So Few of Me by Peter Reynolds. Use the children's literature lesson to discuss the topic of opportunity cost in the story: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/SoFewOfMe.pdf.

Bite Size Economics

Write a short essay explaining the reasoning for tariffs on imports to the United States.

Bite Size Economics

How did the settlement pattern of the United States influence the location decisions for Federal Reserve Banks?

Bite Size Economics

Gas prices are $3.29 a gallon and then increase to $3.69 a gallon due to a shortage. How much would 18 gallons of gas cost at each price? ($59.22; $66.42) How much would you save if you purchased gas at the lower price? ($7.20)

Bite Size Economics

Make a collage of magazine ads that would appeal to consumers urging them to save money, possibly by living greener.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss this quote: "As scarce as truth is, the supply has always been in excess of the demand." - Josh Billings

Bite Size Economics

Use the limerick below to introduce surpluses and shortages. Ask students to make up their own poem about surpluses and shortages to share. There once was a price just too high,So that no one would bother to buy.On the shelf the stuff sat,Gathered dust like a floor mat.A surplus needs a lower price-that's why! And then there was a price oh so low,That folks stood in a long line, oh no!But the shelves were soon bare,Those still waiting sure cared.A higher price would have solvedtheir shortage woes.

Bite Size Economics