Entrepreneurship in the Classroom

As an educator, we want to equip you with engaging ways to help empower students to consider entrepreneurship among their future options.

Resources, Articles and Lesson Plans

Jay Starts a Business

Jay Eagle takes students on an entrepreneurial adventure to start his own bird business in this classroom interactive.

Entrepreneurship Lessons and Resources

From elementary to high school, access these lesson plans and resources to help students explore the world of entrepreneurship.

Black Women Business Startups

Teachers can access resources to help students understand opportunity occupations as an option to consider for their career paths.

Youth Entrepreneurship Guide

This guide helps place a higher emphasis on entrepreneurship throughout the education system.

Building Entrepreneurship Ecosystems in Communities of Color

This guide provides an overview of inclusive entrepreneurship ecosystem building for communities of color.

Video Resources

Learn from entrepreneurs across the region in these short videos about their journeys and businesses.

Webinars and Video Resources

Professional Development for Educators

Browse these on-demand webinars to help equip you on a variety of topics, including entrepreneurship.

21st Century Careers Student Webinars

Expose students to a variety of career paths in this video series where they will hear from local leaders about their careers.

Fed Opportunity Occupations Video Series

Within the Federal Reserve there are several opportunity occupations; learn more about each position in this short video series.

Entrepreneurship in Action

In this video series, meet and learn from entrepreneurs across the region; discussion questions for students are included.

Connect With Us

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Careers

Law Enforcement Officer: Our building and law enforcement teams ensure a safe, secure and high quality work environment for our people and visitors.

Bite Size Economics

Gas prices are $3.29 a gallon and then increase to $3.69 a gallon due to a shortage. How much would 18 gallons of gas cost at each price? ($59.22; $66.42) How much would you save if you purchased gas at the lower price? ($7.20)

Bite Size Economics

Stores often have a surplus of holiday candy after Halloween and Valentine's Day. What methods do store managers use to quickly sell their surplus? (half-price sales; special display) Describe three new and creative ways to reduce this surplus.

Bite Size Economics

How will paying for goods and services change in the future? Invent and illustrate a new method of payment for the year 2025. Label invention parts and write a brief explanation telling how to use your payment method.

Bite Size Economics

Play "Another Action Hero" in Show Business: The Economic$ of Entertainment at www.bos.frb.org/entertainment/index.htm to learn what the film industry can teach about international trade and globalization.

Bite Size Economics

Justin's assets are a $250 bike, a $1299 computer, and $582 in savings. His liabilities are $475 owed on a loan for the computer and $138 owed to his mom. Add Justin's assets and subtract his liabilities from the total. What is Justin's net worth? ($2131 - $613 = $1518)

Bite Size Economics

If a company produced 10 items at $7 per item and sold all 10 at $8.50 each, what is the profit for the producer? (10 x $1.50 = $15)

Bite Size Economics

Ask students to design the "Market of the Future" by drawing a blueprint of their dream store. Have them include basic food departments and cashier areas, and then add original areas to make their market unique.

Bite Size Economics

Explore the evolvement of the payment system by watching Chapter 5 of the Philadelphia Fed's video The Federal Reserve and You. Create a public service announcement highlighting the Fed's role in providing cash and electronic payment services. http://bit.ly/11dWBdQ

Bite Size Economics

Follow the lesson plan for "Abraham Lincoln and the Five-Dollar Note" to learn why Lincoln is portrayed on this note and the features of the redesigned $5 bill: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/Lincoln$5Note.pdf.

Bite Size Economics

Choose a product and research the price of that product during a 10-year period. Graph the changes over time and discuss possible reasons for those changes, such as the increasing priceof materials, a better quality product, inflation, etc.

Bite Size Economics

How do the Federal Reserve and the European Central Bank compare? Read A Look Inside Two Central Banks: The European Central Bank and the Federal Reserve from the St. Louis Fedand create a Venn diagram showing three similarities and three differences between the organizations. http://bit.ly/15JSIQF

Careers

Economic Research: Our research staff conducts innovative research on monetary policy, the payments system, and regional and community issues.

Bite Size Economics

Use the role play There's No Business Like Bank Business toexplore the benefits of saving money in a bank:www.kansascityfed.org/publicat/education/teachingresources/Bank_Business_script.pdf.

Bite Size Economics

Explore myths and realities about the Fed using primary source materials in the Atlanta Fed's lesson Myths, Tall Tales, and Urban Legends: A Lesson on the Facts Behind the Fed. http://bit.ly/YeYn1k

Bite Size Economics

Credit card bills now provide an estimate of how long it will take to pay off a balance making only the minimum payment. Paying more than the minimum can substantially decrease the total amount of the purchase. Discover the savings using the credit card repayment calculator at www.federalreserve.gov/creditcardcalculator.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss Halloween and the practice of "trick-or-treating." Would this holiday be as much fun if the incentive of candy wasn't given out to trick or treaters? Would you still want to "trick-or-treat?" The "treat" can influence the behavior of kids. Take a survey to decide which type of treat is the best incentive: chocolate bars, fruit-flavored candy, gum and other choices.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss homecoming expense choices and opportunity costs. For example, with a limited amount of money, would you choose a fancy limo for transportation? Would you spend more money for a high-dollar outfit instead? Or would you spend your dollars on an expensive restaurant meal before the dance? Discuss the reasoning behind your decisions.

Bite Size Economics

When a company wants to increase their profit, they can reduce their costs (expenses) or increase their sales (income). You are the owner of a new sushi restaurant. Describe two ways to increase your sales and two ways to reduce costs.

Bite Size Economics

Use the Core Concepts Cards net worth calculator, available at www.federalreserveeducation.org/resources/coreconcepts/worksheets/whatsyournet, to figure your net worth. How can you increase assets or decrease liabilities to add value to your net worth?

Bite Size Economics

Discuss the meaning of the following quote: "Budget: a mathematical confirmation of your suspicions." - A.A. Latime

Bite Size Economics

How did the settlement pattern of the United States influence the location decisions for Federal Reserve Banks?

Bite Size Economics

Explore money from around the world by visiting the following website: www.clevelandfed.org/Learning_Center/Online_Activities/explore_money/index.cfm. Discuss money symbols and designs from several chosen countries, then vote for the most beautiful piece of currency. Ask students to redesign a U.S. dollar using more symbolism and color.

Bite Size Economics

Explain the meaning of the following quote: "Our necessities never equal our wants." - Benjamin Franklin

Bite Size Economics

Use Lesson 2: "W Is for Wages, W4 and W2" at www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/paycheck/IYP_lesson2.pdf to learn about gross pay, net pay and the different deductions that are taken from paychecks.

Bite Size Economics

Most states have created 529 plans to assist parents in saving for their children's future education. Have students research plans for the states in their region, including regulators, fees and internet options. Make a chart comparing neighboring states' 529 plans to your home state.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the three types of resources, giving examples of each:Natural - gifts of nature used to make goods and services;Human - workers who make goods and provide services;Capital - goods made and used to provide other goods and services.Hand out magazines and have students find pictures of each type of resource. Use images to create a class resource poster with three columns labeled for the different resource types.

Bite Size Economics

Create a PACED (Problem, Alternatives, Criteria, Evaluate, Decision) grid to determine the costs and benefits of a used car decision. Possible criteria include model; year; gas mileage; and insurance costs. Visit www.econedlink.org/lessons/docs_lessons/463_PACED1.pdf for a sample grid.

Bite Size Economics

Use the lesson plan and role play for "There's No Business Like Bank Business" to teach students the concept of how banks operate as a business: www.kansascityfed.org/publicat/education/teachingresources/No_Business_lesson.pdf and www.kansascityfed.org/publicat/education/teachingresources/Bank_Business_script.pdf.

Bite Size Economics

Research Mattel, Hasbro or other toy companies to see how they determine what toys to produce and supply to retail stores. Use the information you find to predict what toys might be popular in 2020.

Bite Size Economics

Using your local newspaper, find three advertisements for products. List examples of marketing techniques that producers use to entice customers to buy their products, suchas bargain prices or use of brand names. Share your results.

Bite Size Economics

Explain why the United States, Canada and Mexico all gain from voluntary trade among their countries.

Bite Size Economics

Use the FDIC's EDIE the Estimator tool to explore how FDIC insurance protects depositors. Try the simulator using varying deposit balances to determine the FDIC coverage limit for a single account. Check your answer by reviewing the page's Deposit Insurance FAQs. http://1.usa.gov/YVeeTe

Bite Size Economics

Discover what it takes to be a bank examiner at the Federal Reserve by reviewing an examiner job description from the Kansas City Fed. What are the three college degrees recommended for a bank examiner? http://bit.ly/18lWMKo

Bite Size Economics

Discuss "interest" as "payments made for the use of money." Ask students if they think earning interest when they deposit money in a savings account is a good incentive to save. Why or why not?

Bite Size Economics

Discuss how commercials influence what consumers buy. Ask students to give examples of commercials that convinced them to buy a product. Were they happy or disappointed with the purchases? Tell them to give reasons for their answers.

Bite Size Economics

Ask the class to brainstorm ways they could spend $10. List ideas and ask them to narrow it down to one, since the class has only one $10 bill. When there is disagreement on which one, discuss that the scarcity of the money to be spent forces us to make choices.

Bite Size Economics

Pick a local publicly traded company. Research the goods and services that the company produces and sells, and create a four-slide minimum PowerPoint illustrating the company and what it does.

Bite Size Economics

What does Penny Pigeon learn about saving and building assets? Read the Financial Fable Penny Pigeon and the Missing Nest Egg to find out at: http://www.kansascityfed.org/education/fables/index.cfm.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the stock market as a market in which the public buys and sells stock, or shares of ownership in companies. Brainstorm companies that students are familiar with (such as McDonalds, Nike, Toys R Us, etc.) and ask students to nominate the five best choices for stock purchases. Discuss the reasons for their picks.

Bite Size Economics

There was no uniform currency during the Free Banking Era, so state-regulated banks issued their own banknotes. Brainstorm problems that could develop with many different currencies in circulation throughout the United States.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the importance of weekly budgeting. Ask the class to use spending journals to track their purchases for a week. After journals are completed, students should share results for a class list of typical purchases and costs. Have students use the list to create a graph showing the areas where most purchases were made. Discuss ways to cut back on common buys to stay within their budgets.

Bite Size Economics

You are a producer of a new and unique athletic shoe. Develop a poster or commercial to advertise your amazing shoe.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss this quote: "No one has a greater asset for his business than a man's pride in his work." - Hosea Ballou

Bite Size Economics

Discuss the exchange rate of currency as the ratio at which a unit of currency in one country can be exchanged for that of another country. Research the exchange rate for bills from five countries by going to: www.xe.com and using the exchange rate calculator. Which notes were worth more than the American dollar? Which were worth less? Why do you think one country's currency is valued higher than another?

Bite Size Economics

A bear market is one where stocks steadily decline and investors are motivated to sell; a bull market is one where stocks are steadily increasing with investors' optimism. Ask students to design two new symbols (animal or other) to replace the bear and bull images and share why their symbols are good representations of these markets.

Bite Size Economics

Read My Side of the Mountain by Jean Craighead George. Use the children's literature lesson to discuss investing in human capital through acquiring skills and knowledge: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/MySideMountain.pdf

Bite Size Economics

Discuss what economists mean when they say, "There is no such thing as a free lunch." How does this quotation relate to costs and benefits?

Bite Size Economics

Create a trophy that could be awarded as a classroom incentive for the best singer, athlete or leader in the group.

Bite Size Economics

The St. Louis Fed offers instant message simulations on a variety of personal finance topics. Try one and learn about how to open a bank account. http://bit.ly/14C0qf1

Bite Size Economics

Taylor purchased candy bars from the store at 50 cents each. She wants to sell them at school after lunch for $1 each. From what you've learned about supply and demand, what advice would you give Taylor regarding her price?

Bite Size Economics

Read Earth Day-Hooray! by Stuart Murphy. Use the children's literature lesson to discuss the topic of incentives in the story: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/EarthDayHooray.pdf

Bite Size Economics

Discuss this quote: "A man with a surplus can control circumstances, but a man without a surplus is controlled by them, and often has no opportunity to exercise judgment." - Marshall Field

Bite Size Economics

Many supermarkets have non-food services such as floral departments, pharmacies, banks, dry cleaning and DVD rentals. Why do you think supermarkets offer these additional services?