Professional Development for Educators

Our goal: equip and empower educators to incorporate economic and financial concepts in their courses. Access webinars, data and resources to help meet your classroom needs.

Economic Information and Data

Inflation and You Webinar

Learn more about inflation, including monetary policy actions and how households and businesses are affected by price stability.

TEN Magazine

Review summaries of research and current news from the Kansas City Fed in this easy-to-read magazine format.

Community Development

We promote economic development and public understanding that leads to progress for lower-income individuals and communities.

Regional Research

Our work provides insights on local economies, including data on the seven states we serve.

Agriculture and the Economy

Review data and information about a major driver in the Tenth District economy - agriculture.

Banking and Payments

Find out more about issues affecting the banking and payments industries.

Federal Reserve Education

Want more resources? Search lesson plans and resources for educators from every Reserve Bank.

Historical Publications about the Federal Reserve

Dig into the history of the Federal Reserve with our free books.

Speeches

Review recent presentations by Kansas City Fed economists and speakers to get insights on the economy.

Economic Vocabulary

Economic Education

Fifty Nifty Econ Cards

Fifty Nifty Econ Cards are designed for elementary and middle school students to assist them in developing a knowledge base of economic and personal finance words.

Economic Education

Core Concept Cards

Core Concept Cards provide a strong foundation of economic and personal finance vocabulary for secondary students.

Key Educational Resources

Economic Education

Jay Starts a Business

This interactive story takes 4-6 grade students into the world of entrepreneurship by helping them start their own business.

Economic Education

The Money Circle

These lesson plans for high school students focus on four concepts related to money, from the history of money to its use in their own life and our economy.

Videos and Webinars

Evening with the Fed

Educators are invited to hear from our economists on current topics and events - from climate change to Covid-19.

Elementary and Middle School Webinars

Access on-demand professional development webinars made just for elementary and middle school teachers.

Webinars for High School Educators

Learn about new resources and information to help equip your high school classroom.

Career Education Webinars

Learn about skill building and opportunity occupations for students to consider for success on their chosen career path.


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Trivia table
Trivia Title Trivia Content
Bite Size Economics

Explain the meaning of the following quote: "Our necessities never equal our wants." - Benjamin Franklin

Bite Size Economics

Use the "Creative Story Starter-Enterprising Entrepreneur" activity from the Fifty Nifty website: www.federalreserveeducation.org/resources/fiftynifty to have students write about a new product or business they would create.

Bite Size Economics

Read Supermarket by Kathleen Krull. Use the children's literature lesson to discuss how technology has changed markets: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/supermarket.pdf

Bite Size Economics

Use the lesson plan and role play "Professor Finance and Fed Boy Meet the Catastrophe Clan" to discuss the uses and misuses of credit: http://kansascityfed.org/publicat/education/teachingresources/fed_boy_lesson_plan.pdf

Bite Size Economics

Explore money from around the world by visiting the following website: www.clevelandfed.org/Learning_Center/Online_Activities/explore_money/index.cfm. Discuss money symbols and designs from several chosen countries, then vote for the most beautiful piece of currency. Ask students to redesign a U.S. dollar using more symbolism and color.

Bite Size Economics

The mission of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) is to make markets for consumer financial products and services, such as banking and credit, work for Americans. Research the CFPB at: www.consumerfinance.gov/regulations. Choose a regulation and share whether or not you think it is beneficial for businesses as well as consumers.

Bite Size Economics

Compose a song or a rap about being a "savvy shopper." Include verses about comparison shopping, purchasing quality vs. quantity, and avoiding buyer's remorse.

Bite Size Economics

Use the lesson plan and role play for "There's No Business Like Bank Business" to teach students the concept of how banks operate as a business: www.kansascityfed.org/publicat/education/teachingresources/No_Business_lesson.pdf and www.kansascityfed.org/publicat/education/teachingresources/Bank_Business_script.pdf.

Bite Size Economics

How do students buy their goods and services? How many shop online versus going to brick-and-mortar stores? Discuss the use of shopping apps and how they help in comparing prices. Do students ever use apps to comparison shop?

Bite Size Economics

Research the United States' top 15 trading partners by going to: www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/highlights/topcurmon.html. Create a bar chart that shows three things: U.S. total trade with its top 15 trading partners, U.S. exports with its top 15 trading partners; and U.S. imports with its top 15 trading partners. Discuss the graph and what it shows about U.S. trade.

Bite Size Economics

Learn about online banking by becoming a quiz show participant in the Kansas City Fed's role play To Pay the Price. http://bit.ly/ZT730u

Bite Size Economics

Calculate this profit/loss stock statement: 100 shares of XYZ Electronics bought at $29 each + $1.50 broker fee ($2901.50); 100 shares sold at $35 each - $1.50 broker fee ($3498.50); ($3498.50-$2901.50 = $597 profit).

Bite Size Economics

Justin's assets are a $250 bike, a $1299 computer, and $582 in savings. His liabilities are $475 owed on a loan for the computer and $138 owed to his mom. Add Justin's assets and subtract his liabilities from the total. What is Justin's net worth? ($2131 - $613 = $1518)

Bite Size Economics

Why is there a lag time between the beginning of a recessionary period and when it is officially declared a recession? Answer this discussion question and more with the Kansas City Fed's Teaching Tips: Recessions 101. http://bit.ly/11ML6M3

Bite Size Economics

Discuss this quote: "Entrepreneurs and their small enterprises are responsible for almost all the economic growth in the United States." Ronald Reagan

Bite Size Economics

Draw pictures that represent financial words and write the definitions of the words on the opposite side. Save these financial flashcards to use for review. Suggested words: bank, save, deposit, withdrawal, interest, emergency fund, short-term goal, long-term goal.

Bite Size Economics

Use the Kansas City Fed's Exploring Economic Sectors lesson to learn how the Federal Reserve assesses economic conditions in the United States. http://bit.ly/13mAbfu

Bite Size Economics

Make up a rap about regretting a buying decision (buyer's remorse) and wishing you had purchased your opportunity cost instead. Perform it for the class.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce counterfeit money ("fake currency") as the major reason bills have been redesigned. Look at a real note online: www.newmoney.gov/currency/20.htm. Identify security measures placed on new U.S. currency including color, watermarks and micro-printing.

Bite Size Economics

Invite a small business owner to speak to the class. Ask students to prepare interview questions about the assets and liabilities most business owners have and ways to increase thenet worth of a business.

Bite Size Economics

Use the above activity to develop small group businesses with four to five students. Each group should decide on their product, follow the production steps and sell the products to classmates using fake money. Students may choose to incorporate marketing techniques to increase sales. Groups should give a final business report, noting profit/loss, to the class.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss this quote: "America's support for human rights and democracy is our noblest export to the world." - William Bennett

Bite Size Economics

Discuss the correlation between a country's resources and what goods they export and import. Have students choose countries, research their major resources, exports and imports, and share their findings. Discuss which countries might make good trading partners.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss the fable of the Grasshopper and the Ant and its "saving for the future" moral. Rewrite the fable using human characters to make the spending and savings decisions.

Bite Size Economics

Play a game of musical chairs or a game where there is not enough gym equipment for all players. Discuss how the lack of chairs or equipment makes the game more difficult. Scarcity forces us to make choices or decisions.

Bite Size Economics

Research and list the components of GDP by expenditure. What is the largest component of U.S. GDP? (consumption)

Bite Size Economics

Introduce certificates of deposit and savings bonds as two ways to invest money. Look at the financial website: http://financialplan.about.com/od/savingmoney/a/wheretokeepsave.htm. Compare and contrast these two methods of saving to look at the advantages and disadvantages of each.

Bite Size Economics

Visit www.bos.frb.org/entertainment to play the online game Show Business: The Economics of Entertainment and learn about economics in the entertainment industry.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss the meaning of this scarcity quote: "There is no scarcity of opportunity to make a living at what you love; there's only a scarcity of resolve to make it happen." - Wayne Dyer

Bite Size Economics

Discuss the resources used in the production of chocolate (cocoa beans, sugar, milk) and the producers of each resource. Ask students to choose any product, make a list of resources used in its production, and count the number of producers involved in the process. Can anyone find a product that has more than five producers?

Bite Size Economics

Would you want to bank at an unregulated bank? Give a two-minute oral presentation explaining your position.

Bite Size Economics

Find auto loan 36-month interest rates for a used car from three banks. Record the rates and any additional fees or conditions from each bank. Discuss which bank you would choose to finance your car loan and give reasons why.

Bite Size Economics

Nominate a president or famous person in U.S. history (no longer living) for a new $500 bill. Write an essay describing how your nominee contributed to American history and why he/she would be a worthy candidate.

Bite Size Economics

Trivia: U.S. household and nonprofit organizations' liabilities, which include mortgages, consumer credit, loans and securities, totaled almost $14 billion in 2010.

Bite Size Economics

Watch the Economic Lowdown video on equilibrium at: http://www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/podcasts/economic_lowdown_video_3.cfm. How do the concepts of surplus and shortage relate to market equilibrium?

Bite Size Economics

Read Uncle Jed's Barbershop by Margaree King Mitchell. Use the children's literature lesson to discuss starting a business at: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/UncleJedsBarbershop.pdf.

Bite Size Economics

Take turns pantomiming workers performing service type jobs, such as bus driver, construction worker, chef, etc. Have the class try to guess which services are being acted out.

Bite Size Economics

How do the Federal Reserve and the European Central Bank compare? Read A Look Inside Two Central Banks: The European Central Bank and the Federal Reserve from the St. Louis Fedand create a Venn diagram showing three similarities and three differences between the organizations. http://bit.ly/15JSIQF

Bite Size Economics

Discuss this quote: "When written in Chinese, the word �crisis' is composed of two characters. One represents danger and the other represents opportunity." - John Kennedy

Bite Size Economics

Weather conditions can create shortages. Work with a partner to make a list of hardware and department store items that might be in short supply during a snowstorm. (snow blowers, shovels, gloves, hats, etc.). Pantomime the use of each item for the class to guess.

Bite Size Economics

Choose a publicly-traded company, such as Amazon (AMZN), and follow the price of that company's stock each week for a month. Report whether the price has increased or decreased during that time, and provide a recommendation on buying the stock.

Bite Size Economics

Develop a role play about an entrepreneur whose ideas for a new product or business are not well accepted and how he/she meets these challenges and eventually becomes successful. Perform the role play for your class.

Bite Size Economics

Read Saving Strawberry Farm by Deborah Hopkinson. Use the children's literature lesson to discuss the role banks played during the Great Depression: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/StrawberryFarm.pdf.

Bite Size Economics

Read Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder to learn about factors of production, which can lead to economic growth. Draw a flow chart that shows the inputs (productive resources) necessary to create chocolate chip cookies (outputs). http://bit.ly/120lmuN

Bite Size Economics

Research the World Trade Organization (WTO) at: www.wto.org/english/thewto_e/whatis_e/whatis_e.htm. What is the goal of the WTO? List three benefits of the WTO trading system.

Bite Size Economics

Visit the National Archives website to learn about the Homestead Act of 1862, which offered free land in the west to anyone over 21 if they agreed to farm it. Create a skit about the act and its effects on economic growth during that time. http://1.usa.gov/13v9G5v

Bite Size Economics

Research Mattel, Hasbro or other toy companies to see how they determine what toys to produce and supply to retail stores. Use the information you find to predict what toys might be popular in 2020.

Bite Size Economics

The launch of the Air Jordan retro basketball shoe sale caused long lines, fights and store closings across the United States Discuss the concepts of supply and demand in this situation. Ask students to give reasons why these shoes sold out, even though their retail price was $180 a pair.

Bite Size Economics

When you deposit a $5 bill in the bank, will you ever see that exact $5 bill again? Draw a comic strip that shows what happens to the bill that you deposit.

Bite Size Economics

The Bureau of Engraving and Printing produces currency daily to avoid a scarcity of money. How many bills are produced in a day? A) 3,500 B) 350,000 C) 3.5 million D) 35 million Answer: (D)

Bite Size Economics

Wants and needs may vary depending on culture. Research wants and needs around the world and compare and contrast them with your own community.

Bite Size Economics

Make a chart comparing the costs of a new sports car and a used compact car. Figure the expenses for each car, including loan payment, fuel and insurance. If transportation to your job is a need, which car is the better choice?

Bite Size Economics

Your credit card company sets your minimum payment at 2% of your balance. If you have a $1,000 balance on your credit card, what will your minimum payment be? (answer: $20). (Keep in mind, if you only pay the minimum balance most of your payment goestoward interest.)

Bite Size Economics

Compare the prices of store-brand items you need (milk, soap, clothing, etc.) versus the name-brands you want. Are the name brand items worth the price? Give reasons to back your opinion.

Bite Size Economics

Set up a classroom market where students can experience the buying and selling of goods and services by using the "Math: Paying the Price: activity from the Nifty Fifty Econ Cards website: www.federalreserveeducation.org/resources/fiftynifty

Bite Size Economics

Read Meet Kit: An American Girl by Valerie Tripp. Use the children's literature lesson from the St. Louis Fed to role play the effect that unemployment and reduced spending can have onpeople's lives during a recession. http://bit.ly/12Bxppn

Bite Size Economics

The following statements are common descriptions of credit. Discuss each example and use one as a topic for a creative story.Credit is your reputation for financial responsibility.Credit is the time allowed for payment for something sold on trust.Credit is a source of revenue for financial institutions.Credit is NOT more money; it is "tomorrow's" money.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the concepts of asset and liability. Brainstorm a list of students' current assets and discuss items that they would like to own as future assets. Ask students to design a tri-fold showing their assets now, possible future assets and their savings plan to get these assets.

Bite Size Economics

Play "The Price is Right" by showing student teams a variety of store items, having them take turns estimating the price of each. The team closest to the price without overestimating wins a point. Keep track of points to determine the winning estimators.

Bite Size Economics

Trivia: Did you know that the United States is the world's largest consumer of oil? No other country consumes even half as much of the 20 million barrels a day used by the United States.

Bite Size Economics

Brainstorm a list of careers or jobs that are associated with taxes (such as accountant). Research one of these careers to learn about the education qualifications, income level and demand for the job.

Bite Size Economics

Why do bank panics often lead to recessions or larger financial upheavals?

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the Federal Trade Commission's Bureau of Consumer Protection as our nation's consumer protection agency. Its job is to prevent fraud, deception and unfair business practices. Have students research the seven divisions of this agency by going to: www.ftc.gov/bcp/about.shtm. Discuss the importance of each division to consumers.

Bite Size Economics

Review the story of the Three Little Pigs. Do a cost/benefit analysis to compare their houses of straw, sticks and bricks in terms of materials, labor, cost and effectiveness.

Bite Size Economics

Is a home an asset or liability? Research this question and then draw an illustration to explain what you learned and whether you think a house is an asset or liability.

Bite Size Economics

Look at a map of the Federal Reserve System. Discuss reasons why there are more Federal Reserve Banks on the East Coast than the West Coast. Find a map at http://1.usa.gov/11CECzE

Bite Size Economics

View the American Currency Exhibit on the San Francisco Fed's website to explore currency from throughout our nation's history. Choose two bills from different eras and create a Venn diagram to compare and contrast bill symbols and features. http://bit.ly/1922F3l

Bite Size Economics

Bring white elephant items from home (with a parent's signed note). After having an opportunity to trade items, explain the benefits of the trades made. Does everyone agree the trades were positive? If not, why not?

Bite Size Economics

Tell students to imagine they’ve just purchased their first used car. Have them name services their car will need to run efficiently, and goods they could buy to fix up their vehicle. Ask them to go online to find auto stores that provide these goods and services with item costs.

Bite Size Economics

Ask students to inventory their personal assets and liabilities and develop a graphic organizer with their results. Have them rate their personal financial situation as great, okay or needing improvement. Tell them to write three goals for their financial health in the next year.

Bite Size Economics

Ask students to name restaurants they have visited. Tell them to think of all the goods and services that a restaurant is expected to provide. Make a list of these items and ask students to write a creative story titled, “Starting My Restaurant Business” that uses these ideas.

Bite Size Economics

Debate the pros and cons of using money as an incentive for getting higher grades. Is this a good practice? Will this encourage students to work harder for grades?

Bite Size Economics

Are you wise about credit? Learn about developing good credit by reading the Kansas City Fed's Common Cents article "Laying the foundation for responsible credit use." Take theGet a Credit Clue quiz to see if you are credit card worthy. http://bit.ly/11Dsm65

Bite Size Economics

Discuss Halloween and the practice of "trick-or-treating." Would this holiday be as much fun if the incentive of candy wasn't given out to trick or treaters? Would you still want to "trick-or-treat?" The "treat" can influence the behavior of kids. Take a survey to decide which type of treat is the best incentive: chocolate bars, fruit-flavored candy, gum and other choices.

Bite Size Economics

Learn what happens when the price of an asset becomes artificially high in Recession Lesson: Asset Bubbles, available at: www.kansascityfed.org/publicat/education/teachingresources/RecessionLesson-AssetBubbles.pdf.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the concepts of shortage and surplus. Give the example of a popular new toy on sale before the holidays as a possible shortage situation and a less popular toy as a possible surplus. After brainstorming other shortage/surplus situations, have students write a short story titled "Standing in line to buy..."

Bite Size Economics

A bear market is one where stocks steadily decline and investors are motivated to sell; a bull market is one where stocks are steadily increasing with investors' optimism. Ask students to design two new symbols (animal or other) to replace the bear and bull images and share why their symbols are good representations of these markets.

Bite Size Economics

Determine which economic principle relates best to the following quote, and then explain its meaning: "I'm talking about economics as forecasting the future. If you own auto stocks, you ought to be very interested in used car prices." - Peter Lynch

Bite Size Economics

What key historical events led to the establishment of the Federal Reserve System?

Bite Size Economics

Introduce stocks as shares of ownership in a company. Ask students to choose a company they are familiar with and follow its stock price online or in a newspaper. Have them record the closing stock price each Friday for a month. Ask them to give a presentation with the following information: the weekly profit/loss from shares purchased (subtractclosing prices from one week to the next); and the monthly profit/loss (subtract week one from four).

Bite Size Economics

Look closely at a one-dollar bill. What symbols and words do you see that connect this bill with the Federal Reserve?

Bite Size Economics

Read The Goat in the Rug by Charles Blook and Martin Link. Use the children's literature lesson to discuss the topic of resources in the story: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/GoatintheRug.pdf

Bite Size Economics

What's your money personality? Are you a saver, avoider, spender, giver or worrier? Find out by taking the Money Make-up quiz at the end of the Kansas City Fed's Common Cents article "Watch and Learn". http://bit.ly/1923cSJ

Bite Size Economics

What does money mean to you? Purchasing power? Security? Freedom? Brainstorm ideas and then create a collage showing what money can represent.

Bite Size Economics

The St. Louis Fed offers instant message simulations on a variety of personal finance topics. Try one and learn about how to open a bank account. http://bit.ly/14C0qf1

Bite Size Economics

Use the school cafeteria as an example of a business that provides goods and services. Tell students that goods are things that satisfy wants, such as food and utensils. Services are activities that satisfy wants, such as cooking the food and cleaning the cafeteria. Ask students to draw cafeteria foods or other goods on one side of art paper and activities or services on the other side.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss this quote: "The strongest bank in the United States will last only as long as people have sufficient confidence in it to keep their money there." - Carter G. Woodson

Bite Size Economics

Use the lesson plan and role play for "Payment Parliament" to teach students about the many ways we pay for goods and services: www.kansascityfed.org/publicat/education/teachingresources/Payment%20Parliament.pdf.

Bite Size Economics

Ask students to imagine they have landed on a deserted island and will be living there until they are rescued. Have them work in pairs to develop two lists: one of their daily needs to survive, and the other of their wants while on the island. Share lists and discuss ideas with the class.

Bite Size Economics

Resource Trivia: What two fabric resources are used to make paper currency? (linen - 25%; cotton - 75%)

Bite Size Economics

How does the following quote relate to today's rate of savings? "In the old days, a man who saved money was a miser; nowadays, he's a wonder." - Author unknown

Bite Size Economics

Use the Core Concepts Cards net worth calculator, available at www.federalreserveeducation.org/resources/coreconcepts/worksheets/whatsyournet, to figure your net worth. How can you increase assets or decrease liabilities to add value to your net worth?

Bite Size Economics

Discuss the stock market as a public place to invest dollars in stocks, or shares of ownership in a company. Go to: www.essortment.com/invest-money-mutual-funds-stocks-17734.html to learn about stocks vs. mutual funds. Which type of stock would you invest in? Give reasons for your answers.

Bite Size Economics

Solve this income problem: Jay shoveled snow for five neighbors on his block. He earned $10 from two of them, $12 from the third, and $15 from the fourth and fifth. What was his income total? What was his average income from each shoveling job? (Total income: $62.00. Average income per job $12.40)

Bite Size Economics

Discuss the meaning of this quote: "An opportunity cost is an opportunity lost."

Bite Size Economics

Create a three-column KWL (What I know, want to know, and what I've learned) about credit cards. Brainstorm to complete the first two columns, then discuss information from the Federal Reserve's website on credit cards: www.federalreserve.gov/creditcard. Summarize what students have learned by asking them to create true/false statements about credit to complete the third column.

Bite Size Economics

Place a variety of job titles with their associated incomes in a hat and then place an assortment of typical monthly expenses in another hat. Draw one job and income and five monthly expenses. Determine if the income exceeds the monthly expenses.

Bite Size Economics

Learn why the regional structure of the Federal Reserve System is important to understanding the economic conditions in all regions of the country in the Atlanta Fed's video The Fed Explains Regional Banks. http://bit.ly/14A3ASh

Bite Size Economics

Without international trade, you may not have the items on your back. Ask students to look at the labels on their clothing and accessories, and list the countries that manufactured the items. Create a class graph showing all of the countries represented and compare label totals. Discuss whether clothing and goods made in the U.S. are a prevalent as they once were.

Bite Size Economics

Using the Chicago Board of Trade (www.cmegroup.com), follow the prices of basic commodities used in producing food, such as corn, wheat and meat products. Report results at the end of the month and make a prediction on food prices for the next month.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss capital resources in the area of technology by brainstorming types of technological resources used daily by students. Have students rank these devices by importance in their lives. Which of these capital resources could they do without? How would they compensate?

Bite Size Economics

Divide students into two teams. Hold up pictures of natural, human and capital resources and take turns asking teams to identify the type of resource each is. Teams score points for correct answers.

Bite Size Economics

Examine currency from other countries and see what it can reveal about their culture and economy with the Cleveland Fed's Explore Money from Around the World online activity. http://bit.ly/11MDk3I

Bite Size Economics

Write and perform a skit that explores the concept of fair trade, which aims to help producers in developing countries receive higher prices for their goods and improve social and environmental standards. Include advantages and disadvantages to fair trade policies.

Bite Size Economics

Add together all the bill denominations currently in circulation. What is your dollar total? ($1+$2+$5+$10+$20+$50+$100=$188)

Bite Size Economics

Play the online game Pursuit: On the Trail of Economic Growth from the Boston Fed with a small group or individually. This game traces the economic growth of New England throughout history. What events shaped the growth of this area? http://bit.ly/190VJ2L

Bite Size Economics

Estimate the cost: If you want to buy an item for $9.50 with a 9% sales tax, is $10 enough money?

Bite Size Economics

How can pocket money make someone a millionaire? Use anonline compound interest calculator to see how a small monthlyinvestment can grow over time by compounding. Write a plan toreach a financial goal using compound interest.

Bite Size Economics

You have opened a new video game store and hired five full-time employees. If starting salaries are $8.50 an hour and all employees work a 40-hour week, how much should you budget for employee salaries weekly? ($1,700)

Bite Size Economics

Use Lesson 2: "W Is for Wages, W4 and W2" at www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/paycheck/IYP_lesson2.pdf to learn about gross pay, net pay and the different deductions that are taken from paychecks.

Bite Size Economics

Imagine your school district does not have enough money in its budget to provide all the services necessary to run your local schools. Assuming the role of the president of the school board, brainstorm a list of all the benefits of a tax increase. Then consider the perspective of a taxpayer against the increase and make a list of the monetary costs. Use the lists for a classroom debate on the topic.

Bite Size Economics

Entertainment purchases can be a budget downfall. Brainstorm a list of 10 budget-friendly ideas for family entertainment that cost $5 or less.

Bite Size Economics

Create a song or rap that promotes interdependence (when people or nations depend on one another for the goods and services they want) as a way of increasing imports and exports.

Bite Size Economics

Research the new Credit Card Accountability, Responsibility and Disclosure Act (CARD Act) at: www.federalreserve.gov/consumerinfo/wyntk_creditcardrules.htm. What rule targets underage consumers? Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of this rule for college students.

Bite Size Economics

You are a producer of a new and unique athletic shoe. Develop a poster or commercial to advertise your amazing shoe.

Bite Size Economics

Ask students if they have ever run a lemonade stand. Point out that this is an example of a market, where buyers purchase lemonade from sellers. Discuss how sellers set their prices so buyers are willing to purchase. Ask students to give examples of goods from other types of markets they have visited, such as farmers markets, flea markets and garage sales.

Bite Size Economics

In professional sports, a trade is a sports league transaction involving and exchange of players' contracts and/or draft picks. Have students research a sports trade in the NBA. Ask them to write a summary of the trade deal, including the advantages and disadvantages for the teams and/or players involved.

Bite Size Economics

Use the "Professor Finance and Fed Boy Meet the Catastrophe Clan" lesson: www.kansascityfed.org/education to introduce the Credit CARD Act and consumers' credit rights and responsibilities.

Bite Size Economics

Choose a food product and ask students to brainstorm all of the natural, human and capital resources used to produce it. (For example: a candy bar - cacao beans, land, sun, water, sugar, milk, farmers, factory workers, assembly line, wrapper, etc.) Ask students to draw pictures or work together on a mural showing the production process.

Bite Size Economics

Learn about and compare different payment methods in the Kansas City Fed's role play Payment Parliament. http://bit.ly/196JUbk

Bite Size Economics

Make a collage of magazine ads that would appeal to consumers urging them to save money, possibly by living greener.

Bite Size Economics

Read A Chair for My Mother by Vera B. Williams. Use the children's literature lesson to discuss how part of the family income was saved to reach a goal: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/ChairForMother.pdf.

Bite Size Economics

Create a PACED (Problem, Alternatives, Criteria, Evaluate, Decision) grid to determine the costs and benefits of a used car decision. Possible criteria include model; year; gas mileage; and insurance costs. Visit www.econedlink.org/lessons/docs_lessons/463_PACED1.pdf for a sample grid.

Bite Size Economics

Create a map of the Federal Reserve System following the directions from the St. Louis Fed's 25 Cents Worth of History. Locate your state and outline it in your favorite color. Which Federal Reserve Bank is closest to where you live? http:/bit.ly/103kPqV

Bite Size Economics

How did the settlement pattern of the United States influence the location decisions for Federal Reserve Banks?

Bite Size Economics

Look carefully at a picture of a $10 bill. Identify the following features that make the bill legal currency: denomination amount; presidential portrait; serial numbers; Federal Reserve and Treasury seals; important signature. Ask students to look for additional features and discuss.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce banking by asking which students have bank accounts and where they bank. Discuss how a bank operates as a business by asking the following questions: Do banks hold all money deposited in their vaults? (No) What do banks do with the deposited dollars? (They keep the required reserve amount on hand, and lend out most of the remaining dollars.) What would happen if banks kept all the deposited money? (Customers would not get loans, and the bank would not receive interest from the loans.)

Bite Size Economics

Why does it matter that the recent recession coincided with a financial crisis? Research from the Kansas City Fed that examined banking crises in Spain, Norway, Finland, Sweden andJapan found that when a recession is combined with a financial crisis unemployment increases are unusually severe and persistent. http://bit.ly/11m62Nt

Bite Size Economics

What innovations and technological advancements have changed the U.S. payments system in the last 30 years?

Bite Size Economics

Read The Panic of 1907 by the Boston Fed. Write a skit titled "We Survived the Bank Panic," describing the thoughts and emotions that people may feel as they wait in line to withdraw money before their bank closes for business. http://bit.ly/1840vMy

Bite Size Economics

Invite someone in sales to speak about the skills necessary to be a successful salesperson.

Bite Size Economics

When a company wants to increase their profit, they can reduce their costs (expenses) or increase their sales (income). You are the owner of a new sushi restaurant. Describe two ways to increase your sales and two ways to reduce costs.

Bite Size Economics

Depositors want their banks to be "safe and sound." Draw a picture illustrating what these two words mean to you. Discuss what might happen if a bank was not a safe and sound business.

Bite Size Economics

What could happen to the price of gasoline if demand increases worldwide? Will prices increase or decrease? What could happen to the price if new oil pipelines add to the supply of gasoline? Will prices increase or decrease?

Bite Size Economics

The class has been earning incentive points towards a party since the beginning of the year. They've earned 576 points in 8 weeks. What was the average number of points earned each week? How many more points do they need to reach their 1000 point goal?

Bite Size Economics

Food shortages occur throughout the world due to disasters, war and population increases. Research how the United States helps at: http://foodaid.org/resources/the-history-of-food-aid/. Create a visual illustrating how these food programs enable countries to become more self-sufficient.

Bite Size Economics

Why have other countries adopted mobile payments faster than the United States? Find out in the Atlanta Fed's podcast The Future of Mobile Payments. Write a description of a mobile payment option you think would work best in United States. http://bit.ly/11YTIOu

Bite Size Economics

Invite a bank manager to visit as a guest speaker. Create interview questions that ask about the education, skills and responsibilities that are needed for his/her position.

Bite Size Economics

Hand out various grocery receipts to students with the sales tax blacked out. Discuss that some states tax only non-food items, while others tax both food and non-food. Have students calculate the sales tax for both situations.

Bite Size Economics

Look at the Federal Trade Commission's website: www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/pubs/consumer/credit/cre34.shtm to learn about the Fair Credit Reporting Act. Discuss why consumers should order a copy of their credit report yearly.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the first three principles, discussing incentives as things that influence the behavior of people. Discuss the concepts of opportunity cost and monetary cost. Provide the following scenario: You are trying to decide whether to start college right after graduation or wait and work for a year before enrolling. Create a table listing the opportunity costs and monetary costs, as well as the benefits of both choices. Make your final decision and explain your reasoning.

Bite Size Economics

Many students think about running their own business as adults. Ask students to brainstorm types of businesses that interest them. Invite a local business owner from an area of interest to speak to the class about his/her experiences. Prepare for the speaker by making a list of interview questions related to running a business.

Bite Size Economics

In a classroom mini-economy where everyone has a designated income, have the government (the teacher) set tax rates during different periods to illustrate progressive, proportional and regressive taxes.

Bite Size Economics

Choose a job and research its income in two different countries. (Example: a starting teacher in Mexico is paid $10,465 a year, while a starting teacher in Canada is paid $35,400 a year.) Discuss why the same job can have different salary levels in different countries.

Bite Size Economics

Become a board member of a Federal Reserve Bank and learn about the Fed's grassroots approach to gathering regional economic information in the Atlanta Fed's simulation Monetary Policy Starts in Your Own Backyard. http://bit.ly/ZNti2r

Bite Size Economics

Write a haiku on the importance of paying yourself first.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the economic meanings of cost and benefit. Discuss that both are not always money-related, using the example of the costs and benefits of doing homework. Have students brainstorm a list of costs (losses) and benefits (gains) they experience by doing their homework. Take a vote to decide if the costs outweigh the benefits or vice versa.

Bite Size Economics

Brainstorm the skills and knowledge that will be needed in the future to work as a bank teller. Write a job posting that might be used by a local bank describing the characteristics that banks will be looking for when hiring tellers.

Bite Size Economics

Read Pickle Patch Bath Tub by Frances Kennedy. Use the children's literature lesson to discuss the topic of income in the story: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/PicklepatchBathTub.pdf

Bite Size Economics

Discuss that many economic scenarios can cause either a shortage or surplus of used cars. Ask students to brainstorm situations where a used car shortage might develop and where a used car surplus might develop. If you were a used car dealer, what would you do to avoid a large surplus or shortage?

Bite Size Economics

Use Lesson 2: "W Is for Wages, W4 and W2" at www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/paycheck/IYP_lesson2.pdf to learn about gross pay, net pay and the different deductions that are taken from paychecks.

Bite Size Economics

Calculate the monetary costs and benefits of running a lemonade stand using the following assumptions: mix that makes 32-oz. of lemonade costs $3 per container and a package of 50 8-oz. cups is $5. You sell 48 8-oz. cups for $2 each. (costs=$44, benefits=$96)

Bite Size Economics

Have students list all the extra-curricular activities they could participate in for the first semester, including sports, clubs and competitions. Discuss that scarcity of time forces them to choose between several activities they may be interested in.

Bite Size Economics

Learn how a bank operates as a business in the Kansas City Fed's There's No Business like Bank Business activity. http://bit.ly/150sooC

Bite Size Economics

Watch the Economic Lowdown video on supply at: http://www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/economic-lowdown-video-companion-series/episode-1-supply/. Draw and explain the basic supply curve shown in the video. Howcan this curve change based on market conditions?

Bite Size Economics

Discuss that not all organizations are required to pay taxes to the government. These include schools, churches and not-for-profit groups, such as scouts, animal protection agencies and charities. Ask the class for reasons why these organizations are tax-exempt and whether they think this is fair to everyone else. Have students write a letter to the school newspaper explaining their opinion.

Bite Size Economics

Use a blank outline of your state to map your city and the major communities surrounding it. Draw images to represent the businesses and industries that are important in your region, such as a cow for agriculture or a truck for transportation.

Bite Size Economics

Brainstorm the qualities that create credit worthiness. Assume the role of loan officers and review the credit histories of several fictitious individual who are requesting a loan. Decide to approve or reject the requests and provide rationale.

Bite Size Economics

Review your monthly family budget to determine how much your family spends on wants vs. needs. Discuss how your family might reduce the dollar amount of wants over the next few months. Report your budget-saving measures to the class.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss this quote: "Don't put all your eggs in one basket," and relate it to diversifying, or having a variety, of stock investments. Why is diversification a good strategy?

Bite Size Economics

Write about a situation where a scarcity of food, money or time caused a problem, and how that problem was solved.

Bite Size Economics

How will paying for goods and services change in the future? Invent and illustrate a new method of payment for the year 2025. Label invention parts and write a brief explanation telling how to use your payment method.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce wants and needs and give examples of each concept. Tell the students that they will be planning a picnic lunch and will make a chart of wants and needs for the picnic. Draw a T-chart on the board, labeling one side "Needs" and the other "Wants." Ask students for ideas to complete the chart, telling whether each idea is a need or a want.

Bite Size Economics

The threat of war pushed the Federal Reserve Banks to open early because of bank panic fears. How else can war affect the economic health of a country?

Bite Size Economics

Your school had a pancake breakfast to raise funds for the sports teams. Expenses included paying for food and set-up costs, which were $949. The number of dinners sold was 275 at $6.00 each. What was the total income from the event? What was the profit after expenses? ($1650; $701)

Bite Size Economics

Become better informed about payment cards from the Philadelphia Fed's resource What You Need to Know about Payment Cards. Design a poster showing the advantages and disadvantages of the three main types of payment cards. http://bit.ly/18D0HGm

Bite Size Economics

As entrepreneurs invent new products, they often make former products obsolete, or out of date and no longer used. An example of this would be the typewriter, which is now rare because of computer word processing. This concept is called "creative destruction." Ask students to brainstorm and discuss other examples of creative destruction due to new inventions.

Bite Size Economics

Look at a dime and identify the portrait. Use the lesson plan, "Why is Roosevelt on the Dime" available at: http://www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonplans/viewLP.cfm?id=29 to learn more about Franklin Roosevelt and why he was chosen for the dime.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce taxes by asking what happens on April 15. Discuss that one of the purposes of income taxes is to pay for public goods (such as parks and roads) and public services (such as police, fire and military workers). Ask students to imagine what would happen if the government didn't use tax money to provide these goods and services. Have them draw a picture of a situation where a lack of public goods or services caused a problem.

Bite Size Economics

Use the limerick below to introduce surpluses and shortages. Ask students to make up their own poem about surpluses and shortages to share. There once was a price just too high,So that no one would bother to buy.On the shelf the stuff sat,Gathered dust like a floor mat.A surplus needs a lower price-that's why! And then there was a price oh so low,That folks stood in a long line, oh no!But the shelves were soon bare,Those still waiting sure cared.A higher price would have solvedtheir shortage woes.

Bite Size Economics

Political cartoons show opinions. Look at the cartoons featured throughout the Kansas City Fed's Balance of Power, Under Pressure, or Integrity, Fairness and Resolve books. Create an original political cartoon related to the Federal Reserve and explain your message.http://bit.ly/11CEUqr

Bite Size Economics

What can happen when a person or organization doesn't face all the consequences of their actions? Learn about moral hazard and the role it played during the recent recession and financial crisis in the Kansas City Fed's Recession Lesson: Moral Hazard. http://bit.ly/11JIFss

Bite Size Economics

Discuss how this quote relates to entrepreneurship: "Wanting something is not enough. You must hunger for it. Your motivation must be absolutely compelling in order to overcome the obstacles that will invariably come your way." - Les Brown

Bite Size Economics

Use magazine pictures to create a collage of future wants. Develop a budget that includes long term savings goals to purchase these items within the next five to 10 years.

Bite Size Economics

Compare the unit price, or cost per item, of products. To find unit price, divide the price by the number of pieces, ounces or pounds. What would be the unit price for a 20 pound bag of dog food priced at $15? ($.75 per pound)

Bite Size Economics

Use the lesson plan "Currency and the Fed" to introduce students to the functions of money and the Federal Reserve System: www.stlouisfed.org/education/assets/lesson_plans/Currency&Fed.pdf. Ask students to write a brief newspaper article on how money is handled by the Federal Reserve.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the concepts of supply and demand. Give students play money and set out items for sale such as pencils, erasers and stickers. Set some prices low to encourage sales and others higher to discourage buyers. Let students shop, and then discuss the demand for the products at various prices.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the concepts of income and expenses. Give students the following scenario: Your family has decided to take a summer vacation to Disney World. You are responsible for earning money to spend on park passes and souvenirs during the trip. Brainstorm three ways to earn money and estimate approximately how much income you might receive from each activity. Write a letter to your parents explaining your fundraising plans.

Bite Size Economics

Use the above activity to develop small group businesses with four to five students. Each group should decide on their product, follow the production steps and sell the products to classmates using fake money. Students may choose to incorporate marketing techniques to increase sales. Groups should give a final business report, noting profit/loss, to the class.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the concepts of imports and exports. Learn the top three imports and exports of your state by visiting: www.census.gov/foreigntrade/statistics/state/data/index.html. Discuss possible reasons why these resources made the top of the list. Choose a neighboring state and do the same research. Create two Venn diagrams comparing both states' imports and exports.

Bite Size Economics

Research President Obama's 2009 total income by going to: www.whitehouse.gov. ($5,505,409) What is his yearly presidential salary? ($400,000) From what sources did he earn most of his additional income? (sales of his books and winning the Nobel Peace Prize.)

Bite Size Economics

Write an essay on the topic of rebates as incentives for consumers when they purchase goods and services, such as electronics, cars, etc. Do you think rebates motivate people to spend more? Why or why not?

Bite Size Economics

Create a consumer profile, such as a 20-year-old college athlete, and make a collage of products or services using newspaper, magazine ads and/or computer-generated images that would appeal to that type of consumer.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the topic of credit and discuss the responsibilities of credit use. Discuss the rule of thumb that credit should not be used for purchase of basic needs (such as groceries, utilities and rent). Make two lists of goods and services. Include items that are good purchases to make with credit on one list, and on the other list detail items you do NOT want to purchase using credit.

Bite Size Economics

Gas prices are $3.29 a gallon and then increase to $3.69 a gallon due to a shortage. How much would 18 gallons of gas cost at each price? ($59.22; $66.42) How much would you save if you purchased gas at the lower price? ($7.20)

Bite Size Economics

Brainstorm types of financial emergencies (car break-downs, medical problems, home repairs, etc.). Discuss why it is important to have an emergency fund for unexpected expenses.

Bite Size Economics

What is the value of the largest note ever printed? ($100,000) Which president was on the bill? (Woodr