Professional Development for Educators

Our goal: equip and empower educators to incorporate economic and financial concepts in their courses. Access webinars, data and resources to help meet your classroom needs.

Economic Information and Data

Inflation and You Webinar

Learn more about inflation, including monetary policy actions and how households and businesses are affected by price stability.

TEN Magazine

Review summaries of research and current news from the Kansas City Fed in this easy-to-read magazine format.

Community Development

We promote economic development and public understanding that leads to progress for lower-income individuals and communities.

Regional Research

Our work provides insights on local economies, including data on the seven states we serve.

Agriculture and the Economy

Review data and information about a major driver in the Tenth District economy - agriculture.

Banking and Payments

Find out more about issues affecting the banking and payments industries.

Federal Reserve Education

Want more resources? Search lesson plans and resources for educators from every Reserve Bank.

Historical Publications about the Federal Reserve

Dig into the history of the Federal Reserve with our free books.

Speeches

Review recent presentations by Kansas City Fed economists and speakers to get insights on the economy.

Economic Vocabulary

Economic Education

Fifty Nifty Econ Cards

Fifty Nifty Econ Cards are designed for elementary and middle school students to assist them in developing a knowledge base of economic and personal finance words.

Economic Education

Core Concept Cards

Core Concept Cards provide a strong foundation of economic and personal finance vocabulary for secondary students.

Key Educational Resources

Economic Education

Jay Starts a Business

This interactive story takes 4-6 grade students into the world of entrepreneurship by helping them start their own business.

Economic Education

The Money Circle

These lesson plans for high school students focus on four concepts related to money, from the history of money to its use in their own life and our economy.

Videos and Webinars

Evening with the Fed

Educators are invited to hear from our economists on current topics and events - from climate change to Covid-19.

Elementary and Middle School Webinars

Access on-demand professional development webinars made just for elementary and middle school teachers.

Webinars for High School Educators

Learn about new resources and information to help equip your high school classroom.

Career Education Webinars

Learn about skill building and opportunity occupations for students to consider for success on their chosen career path.


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Trivia table
Trivia Title Trivia Content
Bite Size Economics

Your credit report is like a report card. It is used to calculate your credit score. You can receive one free credit report every twelve months from each of the nationwide credit bureaus-Equifax, Experian, and Transunion-by visiting www.annualcreditreport.com.

Bite Size Economics

Explain this quote: "Competition is not only the basis of protection to the consumer, but is the incentive to progress." - Herbert Hoover

Bite Size Economics

Why is money deducted from your paycheck and where does it go? Learn how to read a paystub, discuss different methods for receiving wages, and discover ways to get more from your paycheck with the Kansas City Fed's Putting Your Paycheck to Work resources. http://bit.ly/17nFIa0

Bite Size Economics

Trivia: U.S. household and nonprofit organizations' liabilities, which include mortgages, consumer credit, loans and securities, totaled almost $14 billion in 2010.

Bite Size Economics

Would you want to bank at an unregulated bank? Give a two-minute oral presentation explaining your position.

Bite Size Economics

Trade barriers are costs that raise the price of traded products. Examples are tariffs, import and export quotas, and embargoes. In groups, research and make charts to compare and contrast these barriers.

Bite Size Economics

Taylor purchased candy bars from the store at 50 cents each. She wants to sell them at school after lunch for $1 each. From what you've learned about supply and demand, what advice would you give Taylor regarding her price?

Bite Size Economics

The interest on your savings account has increased from 1% to 2.5%. How much interest would your $100 deposit earn in a year (without compounding) at each percentage? ($1; $2.50) Explain how receiving interest can be an incentive to save.

Bite Size Economics

Use a blank outline of your state to map your city and the major communities surrounding it. Draw images to represent the businesses and industries that are important in your region, such as a cow for agriculture or a truck for transportation.

Bite Size Economics

In a classroom mini-economy where everyone has a designated income, have the government (the teacher) set tax rates during different periods to illustrate progressive, proportional and regressive taxes.

Bite Size Economics

Brainstorm a list of careers or jobs that are associated with taxes (such as accountant). Research one of these careers to learn about the education qualifications, income level and demand for the job.

Bite Size Economics

Create an invention or innovation that would make life easier. Name and describe your invention. What price would you sell it for? What would your income be if you sold 100? 250? 500?

Bite Size Economics

Hold a discussion on this topic: "When choosing a career, income is more important than passion for the job." Ask students to give reasons for their views.

Bite Size Economics

Stores often have a surplus of holiday candy after Halloween and Valentine's Day. What methods do store managers use to quickly sell their surplus? (half-price sales; special display) Describe three new and creative ways to reduce this surplus.

Bite Size Economics

Your credit card company sets your minimum payment at 2% of your balance. If you have a $1,000 balance on your credit card, what will your minimum payment be? (answer: $20). (Keep in mind, if you only pay the minimum balance most of your payment goestoward interest.)

Bite Size Economics

Discuss this quote: "Entrepreneurs and their small enterprises are responsible for almost all the economic growth in the United States." Ronald Reagan

Bite Size Economics

Weather conditions can create shortages. Work with a partner to make a list of hardware and department store items that might be in short supply during a snowstorm. (snow blowers, shovels, gloves, hats, etc.). Pantomime the use of each item for the class to guess.

Bite Size Economics

Look at the Federal Trade Commission's website: www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/pubs/consumer/credit/cre34.shtm to learn about the Fair Credit Reporting Act. Discuss why consumers should order a copy of their credit report yearly.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the concepts of producers and consumers. Brainstorm a list of producers, such as artists, bakers, farmers and manufacturers of different products. Ask students to role-play various producers as they create their products. Have classmates guess what good or service each producer provides for consumers.

Bite Size Economics

Before buying clothes or shoes, consumers should consider several features, such as price, quality, fit, style and comfort. Discuss and rank these features with students to see which ones are most important to them in making a purchasing decision.

Bite Size Economics

Look closely at a one-dollar bill. What symbols and words do you see that connect this bill with the Federal Reserve?

Bite Size Economics

Discuss the word "panic" and brainstorm situations in which people may panic (severe weather, accidents, fire, etc.) How do you feel when you panic? Why could these feelings cause you to take actions you normally wouldn't? Relate these feelings to bank panics.

Bite Size Economics

Examine currency from other countries and see what it can reveal about their culture and economy with the Cleveland Fed's Explore Money from Around the World online activity. http://bit.ly/11MDk3I

Bite Size Economics

Discuss this proverb: "It is a wise man who lives with money in the bank, it is a fool who dies that way."

Bite Size Economics

Look carefully at a picture of a $10 bill. Identify the following features that make the bill legal currency: denomination amount; presidential portrait; serial numbers; Federal Reserve and Treasury seals; important signature. Ask students to look for additional features and discuss.

Bite Size Economics

Create a consumer profile, such as a 20-year-old college athlete, and make a collage of products or services using newspaper, magazine ads and/or computer-generated images that would appeal to that type of consumer.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss the quote: "In our rich consumers' civilization, we spin cocoons around ourselves and get possessed by our possessions." - Max Lerner

Bite Size Economics

Learn more about the importance of credit score by watching "The Drawing Board: your Credit Score" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DWa34pB3pQA&feature=player_embedded.

Bite Size Economics

Create a PACED (Problem, Alternatives, Criteria, Evaluate, Decision) grid to determine the costs and benefits of a used car decision. Possible criteria include model; year; gas mileage; and insurance costs. Visit www.econedlink.org/lessons/docs_lessons/463_PACED1.pdf for a sample grid.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss counterfeit currency and how it has become more prevalent in the U.S. over the years due to technological advancements. Explain how security measures have been added to U.S. bills to thwart counterfeiters, and look at some of these features at: www.newmoney.gov/currency/default.htm. Ask a speaker from a bank to speak to the class on detecting counterfeit currency.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss this quote: "Don't put all your eggs in one basket," and relate it to diversifying, or having a variety, of stock investments. Why is diversification a good strategy?

Bite Size Economics

Use the school cafeteria as an example of a business that provides goods and services. Tell students that goods are things that satisfy wants, such as food and utensils. Services are activities that satisfy wants, such as cooking the food and cleaning the cafeteria. Ask students to draw cafeteria foods or other goods on one side of art paper and activities or services on the other side.

Bite Size Economics

While watching TV commercials within a given time period, identify how many of the products advertised are wants and how many advertised are needs. Using your results, calculate the percentage of each and report to the class.

Bite Size Economics

Brainstorm ways students can earn income and make a chart of ideas. (Examples: allowance, chores, birthday/holiday gifts, garage sales, etc.) Ask students to set future savings goals (for things they will spend their income on) and share with the class.

Bite Size Economics

Bring white elephant items from home (with a parent's signed note). After having an opportunity to trade items, explain the benefits of the trades made. Does everyone agree the trades were positive? If not, why not?

Bite Size Economics

Discuss how businesses invest in capital resources, such as newer computers, machines and technology. How can spending money on these resources lead to profits in the long term?

Bite Size Economics

If you had to choose a president for a new $200 bill, which choice would you select and which would be your opportunity cost? A) John Kennedy or B) Franklin Roosevelt. Have students discuss why they made their choice.

Bite Size Economics

Develop a classroom currency to use as pay for completing projects, following rules and helping others. Discuss income earned from these tasks each week and plan a future action to spend this income at the end of the quarter, semester or year.

Bite Size Economics

Read Saturday Sancocho by Leyla Torres. Use the related children's literature lesson from the St. Louis Fed to learn about the advantages of paying money over bartering for goods.http://bit.ly/18D0u5U

Bite Size Economics

What does money mean to you? Purchasing power? Security? Freedom? Brainstorm ideas and then create a collage showing what money can represent.

Bite Size Economics

Become better informed about payment cards from the Philadelphia Fed's resource What You Need to Know about Payment Cards. Design a poster showing the advantages and disadvantages of the three main types of payment cards. http://bit.ly/18D0HGm

Bite Size Economics

Debate this topic: "The benefits of making financial mistakes outweigh the costs."

Bite Size Economics

Read Ten Mile Day by Mary Ann Fraser. Use the children's literature lesson to discuss the role of production in the development of the transcontinental railroad: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/TenMileDay.pdf

Bite Size Economics

Opportunity cost is the next best choice given up when making a decision. Write and perform a skit where the main character makes a decision on whether to take a part-time job. Make sure to include the opportunity cost.

Bite Size Economics

What can happen when a person or organization doesn't face all the consequences of their actions? Learn about moral hazard and the role it played during the recent recession and financial crisis in the Kansas City Fed's Recession Lesson: Moral Hazard. http://bit.ly/11JIFss

Bite Size Economics

Discuss this quote: "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself". - Franklin D. Roosevelt. How could these words relate to bank panics?

Bite Size Economics

Use the "Professor Finance and Fed Boy Meet the Catastrophe Clan" lesson: www.kansascityfed.org/education to introduce the Credit CARD Act and consumers' credit rights and responsibilities.

Bite Size Economics

Justin's assets are a $250 bike, a $1299 computer, and $582 in savings. His liabilities are $475 owed on a loan for the computer and $138 owed to his mom. Add Justin's assets and subtract his liabilities from the total. What is Justin's net worth? ($2131 - $613 = $1518)

Bite Size Economics

Write a short story about your last five purchases and whether each was a want or a need. Include lessons you've learned about your spending habits and steps you can take in the future to purchase fewer wants and more needs.

Bite Size Economics

Create a skit in small groups about possible financial situations at age 65 (i.e., no savings vs. wealthy investor). Discuss possible actions that can lead to financial security in retirement.

Bite Size Economics

The start-up costs for your lemonade business includes $1.99 for the mix and $2.50 for the cups. If you sell each cup for $.60, how many cups do you need to sell to make a profit? (At least 8 cups.)

Bite Size Economics

Research President Obama's 2009 total income by going to: www.whitehouse.gov. ($5,505,409) What is his yearly presidential salary? ($400,000) From what sources did he earn most of his additional income? (sales of his books and winning the Nobel Peace Prize.)

Bite Size Economics

Explain a market economy as an economy that operates by voluntary exchange between buyers and sellers in a free market not planned or controlled by government. Ask students to research this and other types, such as traditional and command economies: http://www.councilforeconed.org/resources/lessons/whateconisabout-sample.pdf. Discuss the differences in the three economies and why a market economy works best in our country.

Bite Size Economics

Why is a bank holiday not something to celebrate, and why did President Franklin D. Roosevelt establish a national one in 1933? Find out in the Boston Fed's Closed for the Holiday: The Bank Holiday of 1933. http://bit.ly/11I1W4r

Bite Size Economics

What three federal agencies regulate banks? (Office of the Comptroller of the Currency-OCC; Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation-FDIC; and the Federal Reserve)

Bite Size Economics

Discover how the recession influenced the savings habits of consumers in the Recession Lesson: "The Silver Lining of the Economic Downturn" at www.kansascityfed.org/publicat/education/teachingresources/RecessionLesson-SavingsHabits.pdf.

Bite Size Economics

Ask students to work with a partner on the following income/expenses problem: You want to convince your family to buy a new computer to replace the outdated one at home. Create a visual that gives family members ideas on how to cut monthly expenses (such as food, clothing and entertainment) in order to save income for the purchase.

Bite Size Economics

Many entrepreneurs get their start through designing an invention or innovation that becomes successful. Research famous inventors by looking at: www.ideafinder.com/articles/thelists/entrepreneur.htm. As a group, vote on the top three inventors based on their creativity and success.

Bite Size Economics

Watch the Economic Lowdown video on supply at: http://www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/economic-lowdown-video-companion-series/episode-1-supply/. Draw and explain the basic supply curve shown in the video. Howcan this curve change based on market conditions?

Bite Size Economics

Investment Math: Introduce the "Rule of 72" as a method to determine the number of years it will take for your savings to double in value. Give this example: if the interest rate is 2%, dividing 72 by 2=36 years to double your savings. Ask students to figure out the number of years for 4% (18); 6% (12); and 8% (9).

Bite Size Economics

Gather pictures from magazine, local newspaper articles, chamber of commerce promotional material, etc., and create individual or group collages that represent the economy of theregion where you live. Be sure to include the natural, human and capital resources of your area.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss this quote: "America's support for human rights and democracy is our noblest export to the world." - William Bennett

Bite Size Economics

Develop a budget for a classic picnic. Use grocery ads to plan a meal for 20 students that includes an entrêe, two sides and a dessert, for $50 or less

Bite Size Economics

What does a camel have to do with bank supervision and regulation? Find out by reserving the Kansas City Fed's Fed Detective traveling trunk for elementary and middle schoolclassrooms. http://bit.ly/14E67M2

Bite Size Economics

Would you accept a cow as payment? Learn about the four characteristics of money and evaluate various forms of money, including cows, that were used as currency in earlier times by reviewing Kansas City Fed's lesson Early Forms of Money. http://bit.ly/1a8sTip

Bite Size Economics

Use lesson 2, "W is for Wages, W4 and W2," from It's Your Paycheck personal finance curriculum to learn what deductions are taken from weekly/monthly income. Discuss why these deductions are necessary for the government and the individual. www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/paycheck/IYP_lesson2.pdf

Bite Size Economics

Research and list the components of GDP by expenditure. What is the largest component of U.S. GDP? (consumption)

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the definitions for save and spend. Describe short-term savings goals as items students want that will require saving for several months. Ask students to choose an item as a savings goal, estimate the cost of the item and figure the amount they would have to save weekly to reach their goal. Have students share their goals and savings plans with the class.

Bite Size Economics

Use the lesson plan and role play for "There's No Business Like Bank Business" to teach students the concept of how banks operate as a business: www.kansascityfed.org/publicat/education/teachingresources/No_Business_lesson.pdf and www.kansascityfed.org/publicat/education/teachingresources/Bank_Business_script.pdf.

Bite Size Economics

Play 20 Econ Questions or Econ Word Wiz (www.federalreserveeducation.org/resources/fiftynifty) using "producer" as one of the words.

Bite Size Economics

Read Earth Day-Hooray! by Stuart Murphy. Use the children's literature lesson to discuss the topic of incentives in the story: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/EarthDayHooray.pdf

Bite Size Economics

Explore bank supervision and regulation by watching Chapter 6 of the Philadelphia Fed's video The Federal Reserve and You. Write three key facts about each of the video segments: Supervision and Regulation History, the Role of Congress, and Bank Examinations.http://bit.ly/11dWBdQ

Bite Size Economics

The launch of the Air Jordan retro basketball shoe sale caused long lines, fights and store closings across the United States. Discuss the concepts of supply and demand in this situation. Ask students to give reasons why these shoes sold out, even though their retail price was $180 a pair.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss this quote: "No one has a greater asset for his business than a man's pride in his work." - Hosea Ballou

Bite Size Economics

Focus on and discuss human capital: the skills, talents and education that people possess. Discuss how improving human capital through education and training correlates with increasing income. Ask students to research and share education levels and average income of chosen careers by going to the Bureau of Labor Statistics website to look at the Occupational Outlook Handbook: www.bls.gov/oco.

Bite Size Economics

Look at a dime and identify the portrait. Use the lesson plan, "Why is Roosevelt on the Dime" available at: http://www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonplans/viewLP.cfm?id=29 to learn more about Franklin Roosevelt and why he was chosen for the dime.

Bite Size Economics

Research the new Credit Card Accountability, Responsibility and Disclosure Act (CARD Act) at: www.federalreserve.gov/consumerinfo/wyntk_creditcardrules.htm. What rule targets underage consumers? Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of this rule for college students.

Bite Size Economics

Download the St. Louis Fed's Econ Ed Mobile App to explore the cost of using credit. Learn how interest is calculated, and then use the Credit Cost Calculator to see how interest ratesaffect monthly payments and the total cost of a purchase. http://bit.ly/11zNwSM

Bite Size Economics

Compare the prices of store-brand items you need (milk, soap, clothing, etc.) versus the name-brands you want. Are the name brand items worth the price? Give reasons to back your opinion.

Bite Size Economics

Learn why the regional structure of the Federal Reserve System is important to understanding the economic conditions in all regions of the country in the Atlanta Fed's video The Fed Explains Regional Banks. http://bit.ly/14A3ASh

Bite Size Economics

Follow the lesson plan for "Abraham Lincoln and the Five-Dollar Note" to learn why Lincoln is portrayed on this note and the features of the redesigned $5 bill: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/Lincoln$5Note.pdf.

Bite Size Economics

Brainstorms items of value that people invest in, such as real estate, gold, art, coins and jewelry. Ask students to write an essay discussing whether they think these options are better investment areas than the stock market and give their reasons for their opinions.

Bite Size Economics

Ask students to design the "Market of the Future" by drawing a blueprint of their dream store. Have them include basic food departments and cashier areas, and then add original areas to make their market unique.

Bite Size Economics

Hand out various grocery receipts to students with the sales tax blacked out. Discuss that some states tax only non-food items, while others tax both food and non-food. Have students calculate the sales tax for both situations.

Bite Size Economics

Depositors want their banks to be "safe and sound." Draw a picture illustrating what these two words mean to you. Discuss what might happen if a bank was not a safe and sound business.

Bite Size Economics

Many students think about running their own business as adults. Ask students to brainstorm types of businesses that interest them. Invite a local business owner from an area of interest to speak to the class about his/her experiences. Prepare for the speaker by making a list of interview questions related to running a business.

Bite Size Economics

Using the Chicago Board of Trade (www.cmegroup.com), follow the prices of basic commodities used in producing food, such as corn, wheat and meat products. Report results at the end of the month and make a prediction on food prices for the next month.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss what Thomas Jefferson meant when he said, "The merchant has no country."

Bite Size Economics

Draw a picture showing how a scarcity of natural resources can affect your daily life.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce stocks as shares of ownership in a company. Ask students to choose a company they are familiar with and follow its stock price online or in a newspaper. Have them record the closing stock price each Friday for a month. Ask them to give a presentation with the following information: the weekly profit/loss from shares purchased (subtractclosing prices from one week to the next); and the monthly profit/loss (subtract week one from four).

Bite Size Economics

Play "Econ Bingo" after reading directions, downloading bingo cards and sample money from the Fifty Nifty Econ Cards website: www.federalreserveeducation.org/resources/fiftynifty. Award $5 of money for each bingo during the game. Let winning students use their income to purchase incentives you have supplied.

Bite Size Economics

Pick a local publicly traded company. Research the goods and services that the company produces and sells, and create a four-slide minimum PowerPoint illustrating the company and what it does.

Bite Size Economics

Research and record the population of five different cities or communities within your region. Develop a bar graph to compare the population results. Discuss how the population of an area can affect its economy, in terms of jobs and housing.

Bite Size Economics

Research the purposes of the World Trade Organization (WTO). Hold a mock debate where two countries use the WTO as a forum to discuss their disagreements concerning a trade policy.

Bite Size Economics

Money doesn't grow on trees, but it can grow. Watch No Frills Money Skills episode 1 from the St. Louis Fed. Develop a table showing how saving $1,000 at 3% annual interest can compound your savings over a 6-year period. http://bit.ly/11OJ5Pt

Bite Size Economics

Discuss investing in a savings account to earn interest (payment made for the use of your money). Show how interest is compounded. For example: $100x5% annual interest = $105 in a year 1; $105x5% annual interest = $110.25 in year 2; $110.25x5% annual interest = $115.76 in year 3. Ask students to use calculators to figure the savings account totals in years 4 and 5. (Year 4 = $121.55; Year 5 = $127.63)

Bite Size Economics

Develop a chart listing 10 tips that will help the environment through protecting natural resources. (Example: Pick up litter along trails and waterways.)

Bite Size Economics

What could happen to the price of gasoline if demand increases worldwide? Will prices increase or decrease? What could happen to the price if new oil pipelines add to the supply of gasoline? Will prices increase or decrease?

Bite Size Economics

Invite someone in sales to speak about the skills necessary to be a successful salesperson.

Bite Size Economics

Read Saturday Sancocho by Leyla Torres. Use the children's literature lesson to discuss the topic of bartering as a form of trade: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/SaturdaySancocho.pdf

Bite Size Economics

Introduce certificates of deposit and savings bonds as two ways to invest money. Look at the financial website: http://financialplan.about.com/od/savingmoney/a/wheretokeepsave.htm. Compare and contrast these two methods of saving to look at the advantages and disadvantages of each.

Bite Size Economics

Read My Side of the Mountain by Jean Craighead George. Use the children's literature lesson to discuss investing in human capital through acquiring skills and knowledge: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/MySideMountain.pdf

Bite Size Economics

Use the above activity to develop small group businesses with four to five students. Each group should decide on their product, follow the production steps and sell the products to classmates using fake money. Students may choose to incorporate marketing techniques to increase sales. Groups should give a final business report, noting profit/loss, to the class.

Bite Size Economics

Imagine you are at a college football game. Brainstorm the different goods and services available in the stadium. What resources were required to create those goods and services?

Bite Size Economics

Discuss this quote: "A man with a surplus can control circumstances, but a man without a surplus is controlled by them, and often has no opportunity to exercise judgment." - Marshall Field

Bite Size Economics

Which is greater: $1 million, or a penny that doubles in value for 30 days? Use a calculator to figure out the compound interest of the doubling penny by taking each new total and multiplying by 2 to double. (The final total for the doubling penny is $5,368,709.12)

Bite Size Economics

Why do bank panics often lead to recessions or larger financial upheavals?

Bite Size Economics

Create a rap or song titled, "Invest in Yourself." Include all the ways to invest in your human capital, such as more education, training and practicing to gain experience, and taking care of your health. Perform your verses for the class.

Bite Size Economics

Create a song or rap that promotes interdependence (when people or nations depend on one another for the goods and services they want) as a way of increasing imports and exports.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss the meaning of this quote: "Henry Ford was right. A prosperous economy requires that workers be able to buy the products they produce. This is as true in a global economy as a national one." - John J. Sweeney

Bite Size Economics

Use the "Creative Story Starter-Enterprising Entrepreneur" activity from the Fifty Nifty website: www.federalreserveeducation.org/resources/fiftynifty to have students write about a new product or business they would create.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce budgeting as a plan for spending, saving and sharing money by balancing income with expenses. Ask students to divide drawing paper into three sections and draw examples of these three ways to use money. Ask them to explain which of these examples is easiest for them to do and to give reasons why.

Bite Size Economics

Check out the Kansas City Fed's Financial Fables ebooks to discover how "money morals" can help students from preschool to fifth grade become money smart. http://bit.ly/11OINYK

Bite Size Economics

Use the lesson plan and role play "Professor Finance and Fed Boy Meet the Catastrophe Clan" to discuss the uses and misuses of credit: http://kansascityfed.org/publicat/education/teachingresources/fed_boy_lesson_plan.pdf

Bite Size Economics

Read Isabel's Car Wash by Sheila Bair and Judy Stead. Discuss how Isabel started her car wash with help from investors, who became part owners with her. Did the car wash earn a profit or show a loss in the story?

Bite Size Economics

Discuss capital resources in the area of technology by brainstorming types of technological resources used daily by students. Have students rank these devices by importance in their lives. Which of these capital resources could they do without? How would they compensate?

Bite Size Economics

Brainstorm the skills and knowledge that will be needed in the future to work as a bank teller. Write a job posting that might be used by a local bank describing the characteristics that banks will be looking for when hiring tellers.

Bite Size Economics

Explore money from around the world by visiting the following website: www.clevelandfed.org/Learning_Center/Online_Activities/explore_money/index.cfm. Discuss money symbols and designs from several chosen countries, then vote for the most beautiful piece of currency. Ask students to redesign a U.S. dollar using more symbolism and color.

Bite Size Economics

Invite a small business owner to speak to the class. Ask students to prepare interview questions about the assets and liabilities most business owners have and ways to increase thenet worth of a business.

Bite Size Economics

Become a board member of a Federal Reserve Bank and learn about the Fed's grassroots approach to gathering regional economic information in the Atlanta Fed's simulation Monetary Policy Starts in Your Own Backyard. http://bit.ly/ZNti2r

Bite Size Economics

Choose a publicly-traded company, such as Amazon (AMZN), and follow the price of that company's stock each week for a month. Report whether the price has increased or decreased during that time, and provide a recommendation on buying the stock.

Bite Size Economics

Read Something from Nothing by Phoebe Gilman. Use the children's literature lesson to discuss the topic of opportunity cost in the story: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/SomethingNothing.pdf

Bite Size Economics

Imagine your school district does not have enough money in its budget to provide all the services necessary to run your local schools. Assuming the role of the president of the school board, brainstorm a list of all the benefits of a tax increase. Then consider the perspective of a taxpayer against the increase and make a list of the monetary costs. Use the lists for a classroom debate on the topic.

Bite Size Economics

Wants and needs may vary depending on culture. Research wants and needs around the world and compare and contrast them with your own community.

Bite Size Economics

Why are federal laws necessary to protect the civil rights of consumers?

Bite Size Economics

Read Scraps of Time 1960s: Abby Takes a Stand by Patricia C. McKissak. Use the children's literature lesson to learn about how taxes fund transfer programs such as Head Start and Medicaid: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/Scraps_of_time.pdf

Bite Size Economics

Take turns pantomiming workers performing service type jobs, such as bus driver, construction worker, chef, etc. Have the class try to guess which services are being acted out.

Bite Size Economics

When you deposit a $5 bill in the bank, will you ever see that exact $5 bill again? Draw a comic strip that shows what happens to the bill that you deposit.

Bite Size Economics

In groups, construct story problems that feature characters needing to calculate amounts to save or spend. Example: Joe wants to save $500 for a trip to Chicago in six months. How much does he need to save each week to meet his goal?

Bite Size Economics

Discuss the difference between fixed expenses (those costs that do not change) and variable expenses (those costs that can change). Ask students to interview a parent to discover what fixed and variable expenses they pay monthly. Report findings to the class.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss how this quote relates to entrepreneurship: "Wanting something is not enough. You must hunger for it. Your motivation must be absolutely compelling in order to overcome the obstacles that will invariably come your way." - Les Brown

Bite Size Economics

Brainstorm types of financial emergencies (car break-downs, medical problems, home repairs, etc.). Discuss why it is important to have an emergency fund for unexpected expenses.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the topic of credit and discuss the responsibilities of credit use. Discuss the rule of thumb that credit should not be used for purchase of basic needs (such as groceries, utilities and rent). Make two lists of goods and services. Include items that are good purchases to make with credit on one list, and on the other list detail items you do NOT want to purchase using credit.

Bite Size Economics

You have opened a new video game store and hired five full-time employees. If starting salaries are $8.50 an hour and all employees work a 40-hour week, how much should you budget for employee salaries weekly? ($1,700)

Bite Size Economics

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, or FDIC, insures bank accounts up to $250,000 per account holder. What part of $1,000,000 is $250,000? (answer: one fourth or 25%)

Bite Size Economics

Discuss the costs and benefits, both monetary and nonmonetary, of having a public school system. Research what it costs taxpayers per year for a student to attend public school, using your state department of education website. What are the benefits of public education? Arethere any costs? What are the benefits to taxpayers that make themwilling to share the costs? Write a brief essay explaining your ideas.

Bite Size Economics

Make a list of incentives that would persuade you to complete the task of cleaning your bedroom from top to bottom. Which of these incentives would your parents agree to?

Bite Size Economics

Discuss this quote: "As scarce as truth is, the supply has always been in excess of the demand." - Josh Billings

Bite Size Economics

Nominate a president or famous person in U.S. history (no longer living) for a new $500 bill. Write an essay describing how your nominee contributed to American history and why he/she would be a worthy candidate.

Bite Size Economics

Carl Sandburg once said, "Money is power, freedom, a cushion, the root of all evil, the sum of all blessings." Discuss how money could be explained in each of these different ways.

Bite Size Economics

Political cartoons show opinions. Look at the cartoons featured throughout the Kansas City Fed's Balance of Power, Under Pressure, or Integrity, Fairness and Resolve books. Create an original political cartoon related to the Federal Reserve and explain your message.http://bit.ly/11CEUqr

Bite Size Economics

Just for fun, try saying this tongue twister quickly three times: Skyler scored the scarce scholarship.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce taxes by asking what happens on April 15. Discuss that one of the purposes of income taxes is to pay for public goods (such as parks and roads) and public services (such as police, fire and military workers). Ask students to imagine what would happen if the government didn't use tax money to provide these goods and services. Have them draw a picture of a situation where a lack of public goods or services caused a problem.

Bite Size Economics

Bank XYZ is examined and scored every year to make sure it is following banking rules as a safe and sound place for your money. The last four scores were 3, 2, 2 and 1. What is the average score of Bank XYZ? (Answer: 2)

Bite Size Economics

Change the lyrics of a popular song so that they now convince someone to keep their liabilities low for better financial health.

Bite Size Economics

Read The Panic of 1907 by the Boston Fed. Write a skit titled "We Survived the Bank Panic," describing the thoughts and emotions that people may feel as they wait in line to withdraw money before their bank closes for business. http://bit.ly/1840vMy

Bite Size Economics

Learn about the sectors of the Federal Reserve's Beige Book in the lesson Exploring Economic Sectors, available at: www.kansascityfed.org/publicat/education/teachingresources/Exploring-Economic-Sectors.pdf. Use the discussion questions provided for each sector to explore the concepts of supply and demand.

Bite Size Economics

Read The Goat in the Rug by Charles Blook and Martin Link. Use the children's literature lesson to discuss the topic of resources in the story: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/GoatintheRug.pdf

Bite Size Economics

Invite a bank manager to visit as a guest speaker. Create interview questions that ask about the education, skills and responsibilities that are needed for his/her position.

Bite Size Economics

Read Supermarket by Kathleen Krull. Use the children's literature lesson to discuss how technology has changed markets: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/supermarket.pdf

Bite Size Economics

Draw a cartoon to portray one of the following label instructions found on consumer goods: hairdryer-never use while sleeping; iron-do not iron clothes on body; child's costume-cape does not enable user to fly.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss "interest" as "payments made for the use of money." Ask students if they think earning interest when they deposit money in a savings account is a good incentive to save. Why or why not?

Bite Size Economics

Introduce counterfeit money ("fake currency") as the major reason bills have been redesigned. Look at a real note online: www.newmoney.gov/currency/20.htm. Identify security measures placed on new U.S. currency including color, watermarks and micro-printing.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss the fable of the Grasshopper and the Ant and its "saving for the future" moral. Rewrite the fable using human characters to make the spending and savings decisions.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss this quote: "The strongest bank in the United States will last only as long as people have sufficient confidence in it to keep their money there." - Carter G. Woodson

Bite Size Economics

You are a producer of a new and unique athletic shoe. Develop a poster or commercial to advertise your amazing shoe.

Bite Size Economics

Through a story and activities, Piggy Bank Primer introduces students to economic concepts such as saving and budgeting: http://www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/piggy_bank_primer/StudentSavingBudgeting.pdf.

Bite Size Economics

Food shortages occur throughout the world due to disasters, war and population increases. Research how the United States helps at: http://foodaid.org/resources/the-history-of-food-aid/. Create a visual illustrating how these food programs enable countries to become more self-sufficient.

Bite Size Economics

Review the credit scenarios from the Dallas Fed's Building Wealth in the Classroom, Lesson 9. Choose one and decide whether the teen described should borrow money. Write a short persuasive essay with reasons to support your answer. http://bit.ly/10IsJHM

Bite Size Economics

When a company wants to increase their profit, they can reduce their costs (expenses) or increase their sales (income). You are the owner of a new sushi restaurant. Describe two ways to increase your sales and two ways to reduce costs.

Bite Size Economics

Research the United States' top 15 trading partners by going to: www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/highlights/topcurmon.html. Create a bar chart that shows three things: U.S. total trade with its top 15 trading partners, U.S. exports with its top 15 trading partners; and U.S. imports with its top 15 trading partners. Discuss the graph and what it shows about U.S. trade.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the stock market as a market in which the public buys and sells stock, or shares of ownership in companies. Brainstorm companies that students are familiar with (such as McDonalds, Nike, Toys R Us, etc.) and ask students to nominate the five best choices for stock purchases. Discuss the reasons for their picks.

Bite Size Economics

Make a collage of magazine ads that would appeal to consumers urging them to save money, possibly by living greener.

Bite Size Economics

Draw a cartoon about a time when you experienced either a buyer's high or buyer's remorse after a purchase. In the panels, show the purchase, how the purchase made you feel and what you might do differently in the future.

Bite Size Economics

Is a home an asset or liability? Research this question and then draw an illustration to explain what you learned and whether you think a house is an asset or liability.

Bite Size Economics

Think of people at school who are producers. One example might be cafeteria workers who produce breakfast and lunch for students. Others could be a custodian, principal, administrative assistant or any teacher. Make a list of these producers and the goods or services they offer. Ask each student to write a thank-you note to one of these producers.

Bite Size Economics

Set up a classroom market where students can experience the buying and selling of goods and services by using the "Math: Paying the Price: activity from the Nifty Fifty Econ Cards website: www.federalreserveeducation.org/resources/fiftynifty

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What key historical events led to the establishment of the Federal Reserve System?

Bite Size Economics

Use the lesson "M&M Interesting," found at http://ecedweb.unomaha.edu/lessons/M&M6-8.pdf# to learn about the advantages of compound interest. Discuss why it is important to start a savings account while you are young.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss the growing threat of identity theft. Ask students to write tips for consumers to follow in keeping their identity safe. (Example: Memorize your Social Security number so you won't need to carry your card with you.)

Bite Size Economics

Ask students to imagine they have landed on a deserted island and will be living there until they are rescued. Have them work in pairs to develop two lists: one of their daily needs to survive, and the other of their wants while on the island. Share lists and discuss ideas with the class.

Bite Size Economics

Think you have what it takes to steer our country's central bank? Play the Chair the Fed game from the San Francisco Fed to try your hand at monetary policy. http://sffed-education.org/chairthefed/default.html

Bite Size Economics

Discuss how commercials influence what consumers buy. Ask students to give examples of commercials that convinced them to buy a product. Were they happy or disappointed with the purchases? Tell them to give reasons for their answers.

Bite Size Economics

How do students buy their goods and services? How many shop online versus going to brick-and-mortar stores? Discuss the use of shopping apps and how they help in comparing prices. Do students ever use apps to comparison shop?

Bite Size Economics

Draw a picture that shows farmers trading equipment, crops or labor with each other. Explain how this trade situation helps farmers and their families.

Bite Size Economics

Some areas routinely experience water shortages. List the ways you use water every day. How could you cut down your usage or recycle water to help reduce water shortages? Create a public service announcement featuring your water saving ideas.

Bite Size Economics

View the American Currency Exhibit on the San Francisco Fed's website to explore currency from throughout our nation's history. Choose two bills from different eras and create a Venn diagram to compare and contrast bill symbols and features. http://bit.ly/1922F3l

Bite Size Economics

Compose a song or a rap about being a "savvy shopper." Include verses about comparison shopping, purchasing quality vs. quantity, and avoiding buyer's remorse.

Bite Size Economics

In preparation for homecoming, identify what is needed for the event. Then divide the list of items into goods and services. Rank the list in order of importance to you. What goods and services could you give up if you were on a limited budget?

Bite Size Economics

Use the Kansas City Fed's Teaching Tips: Is Your Bank Account Safe? to learn what happens when a bank fails and how the FDIC steps in following a bank's closing. Make a brochure that explains why money is well-protected in U.S. banks. http://kansascityfed.org/education/foreducators/high-school/teaching-tips/is-your-bank-safe.cfm

Bite Size Economics

Look up the current national budget deficit at www.brillig.com/debt_clock. Consider methods to reduce the deficit, and write a letter to Congress with recommendations.

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What is the value of the largest note ever printed? ($100,000) Which president was on the bill? (Woodrow Wilson)

Bite Size Economics

A bear market is one where stocks steadily decline and investors are motivated to sell; a bull market is one where stocks are steadily increasing with investors' optimism. Ask students to design two new symbols (animal or other) to replace the bear and bull images and share why their symbols are good representations of these markets.

Bite Size Economics

Read Bunny Money by Rosemary Wells. Use the children's literature lesson to discuss the topic of short and long-term savings goals: www.kansascityfed.org/publicat/education/teachingresources/Bunny-Money-Lesson-Plan.pdf.

Bite Size Economics

Working in groups, use restaurant menus to pick something to order and then calculate the sales tax on the order. Report the cost with tax and figure the tip using the tax rate as a guide.

Bite Size Economics

Use a graphic organizer to show how the price of gas varies from your state to several neighboring states. How can the same gallon of gas from the same distributor, such as Shell or Phillips, differ in price from one state to the next?

Bite Size Economics

Choose a food product and ask students to brainstorm all of the natural, human and capital resources used to produce it. (For example: a candy bar - cacao beans, land, sun, water, sugar, milk, farmers, factory workers, assembly line, wrapper, etc.) Ask students to draw pictures or work together on a mural showing the production process.

Bite Size Economics

If U.S. exports to China are worth $8 billion, and U.S. imports from China are worth $34 billion, what is the total trade amount? ($42 billion) What is the trade deficit? ($26 billion)

Bite Size Economics

Why have other countries adopted mobile payments faster than the United States? Find out in the Atlanta Fed's podcast The Future of Mobile Payments. Write a description of a mobile payment option you think would work best in United States. http://bit.ly/11YTIOu

Bite Size Economics

Interview family members or neighbors about the recent recession and any changes or effects it had on their lifestyles. Report your findings to the class.

Bite Size Economics

Write a short essay explaining the reasoning for tariffs on imports to the United States.

Bite Size Economics

Write a haiku on the importance of paying yourself first.

Bite Size Economics

How does a reces