Professional Development for Educators

Our goal: equip and empower educators to incorporate economic and financial concepts in their courses. Access webinars, data and resources to help meet your classroom needs.

Economic Information and Data

Inflation and You Webinar

Learn more about inflation, including monetary policy actions and how households and businesses are affected by price stability.

TEN Magazine

Review summaries of research and current news from the Kansas City Fed in this easy-to-read magazine format.

Community Development

We promote economic development and public understanding that leads to progress for lower-income individuals and communities.

Regional Research

Our work provides insights on local economies, including data on the seven states we serve.

Agriculture and the Economy

Review data and information about a major driver in the Tenth District economy - agriculture.

Banking and Payments

Find out more about issues affecting the banking and payments industries.

Federal Reserve Education

Want more resources? Search lesson plans and resources for educators from every Reserve Bank.

Historical Publications about the Federal Reserve

Dig into the history of the Federal Reserve with our free books.

Speeches

Review recent presentations by Kansas City Fed economists and speakers to get insights on the economy.

Economic Vocabulary

Economic Education

Fifty Nifty Econ Cards

Fifty Nifty Econ Cards are designed for elementary and middle school students to assist them in developing a knowledge base of economic and personal finance words.

Economic Education

Core Concept Cards

Core Concept Cards provide a strong foundation of economic and personal finance vocabulary for secondary students.

Key Educational Resources

Economic Education

Jay Starts a Business

This interactive story takes 4-6 grade students into the world of entrepreneurship by helping them start their own business.

Economic Education

The Money Circle

These lesson plans for high school students focus on four concepts related to money, from the history of money to its use in their own life and our economy.

Videos and Webinars

Evening with the Fed

Educators are invited to hear from our economists on current topics and events - from climate change to Covid-19.

Elementary and Middle School Webinars

Access on-demand professional development webinars made just for elementary and middle school teachers.

Webinars for High School Educators

Learn about new resources and information to help equip your high school classroom.

Career Education Webinars

Learn about skill building and opportunity occupations for students to consider for success on their chosen career path.


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Trivia table
Trivia Title Trivia Content
Bite Size Economics

Invite a small business owner to speak to the class. Ask students to prepare interview questions about the assets and liabilities most business owners have and ways to increase thenet worth of a business.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss this quote: "Entrepreneurs and their small enterprises are responsible for almost all the economic growth in the United States." Ronald Reagan

Bite Size Economics

Explain a market economy as an economy that operates by voluntary exchange between buyers and sellers in a free market not planned or controlled by government. Ask students to research this and other types, such as traditional and command economies: http://www.councilforeconed.org/resources/lessons/whateconisabout-sample.pdf. Discuss the differences in the three economies and why a market economy works best in our country.

Bite Size Economics

Develop a role play about an entrepreneur whose ideas for a new product or business are not well accepted and how he/she meets these challenges and eventually becomes successful. Perform the role play for your class.

Bite Size Economics

How did the settlement pattern of the United States influence the location decisions for Federal Reserve Banks?

Bite Size Economics

How will paying for goods and services change in the future? Invent and illustrate a new method of payment for the year 2025. Label invention parts and write a brief explanation telling how to use your payment method.

Bite Size Economics

Why do bank panics often lead to recessions or larger financial upheavals?

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the following formula: Assets-Liabilities = Net Worth, or your economic wealth. Use Money Circle Theme 3, Lesson 1 found at: www.federalreserveeducation.org/resources/MoneyCircle. Discuss the assets, liabilities and net worth of the student in the Activity 1 story. Ask students to write a similar story about themselves, listing current assets, liabilities and assessing their net worth.

Bite Size Economics

What does a camel have to do with bank supervision and regulation? Find out by reserving the Kansas City Fed's Fed Detective traveling trunk for elementary and middle schoolclassrooms. http://bit.ly/14E67M2

Bite Size Economics

A crayon factory increases its production in the months before school starts each year. If the factory produces 2,000 boxes of crayons in each five-day week for 12 weeks, how many total boxes are manufactured? (2,000 x 5=10,000 x 12=120,000)

Bite Size Economics

Read Earth Day-Hooray! by Stuart Murphy. Use the children's literature lesson to discuss the topic of incentives in the story: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/EarthDayHooray.pdf

Bite Size Economics

Read Saving Strawberry Farm by Deborah Hopkinson. Use the children's literature lesson to discuss the role banks played during the Great Depression: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/StrawberryFarm.pdf.

Bite Size Economics

Compare the prices of store-brand items you need (milk, soap, clothing, etc.) versus the name-brands you want. Are the name brand items worth the price? Give reasons to back your opinion.

Bite Size Economics

Go to the following website to learn about McDonald's: http://www.aboutmcdonalds.com/mcd/our_company/mcd_history.html. Look through the timeline and share three risks the company took as it became an established business.

Bite Size Economics

Learn why the regional structure of the Federal Reserve System is important to understanding the economic conditions in all regions of the country in the Atlanta Fed's video The Fed Explains Regional Banks. http://bit.ly/14A3ASh

Bite Size Economics

Look at a map of the Federal Reserve System. Discuss reasons why there are more Federal Reserve Banks on the East Coast than the West Coast. Find a map at http://1.usa.gov/11CECzE

Bite Size Economics

Talk about the choices and opportunity costs of school cafeteria lunches with students. Compare the entrêe, salad, sandwich and other choices for the day. What final choice did they make? What was their opportunity cost? Continue each day for a week and have students graph individual and class choices and opportunity costs.

Bite Size Economics

Trivia: Did you know that the United States is the world's largest consumer of oil? No other country consumes even half as much of the 20 million barrels a day used by the United States.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the concepts of income and expenses. Give students the following scenario: Your family has decided to take a summer vacation to Disney World. You are responsible for earning money to spend on park passes and souvenirs during the trip. Brainstorm three ways to earn money and estimate approximately how much income you might receive from each activity. Write a letter to your parents explaining your fundraising plans.

Bite Size Economics

Trivia: The Federal Reserve Act was signed by President Woodrow Wilson in 1913. The average annual income that year was $800.

Bite Size Economics

Are you wise about credit? Learn about developing good credit by reading the Kansas City Fed's Common Cents article "Laying the foundation for responsible credit use." Take theGet a Credit Clue quiz to see if you are credit card worthy. http://bit.ly/11Dsm65

Bite Size Economics

Tell students to imagine they’ve just purchased their first used car. Have them name services their car will need to run efficiently, and goods they could buy to fix up their vehicle. Ask them to go online to find auto stores that provide these goods and services with item costs.

Bite Size Economics

How do students buy their goods and services? How many shop online versus going to brick-and-mortar stores? Discuss the use of shopping apps and how they help in comparing prices. Do students ever use apps to comparison shop?

Bite Size Economics

Estimate the cost: If you want to buy an item for $9.50 with a 9% sales tax, is $10 enough money?

Bite Size Economics

Discover how the recession influenced the savings habits of consumers in the Recession Lesson: "The Silver Lining of the Economic Downturn" at www.kansascityfed.org/publicat/education/teachingresources/RecessionLesson-SavingsHabits.pdf.

Bite Size Economics

Learn about federal income taxes, FICA, W-4 and W-2 forms in Know your dough Lesson Two: "W" is for Wages, W-4 and W-2: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/paycheck/IYP_lesson2.pdf.

Bite Size Economics

When a company wants to increase their profit, they can reduce their costs (expenses) or increase their sales (income). You are the owner of a new sushi restaurant. Describe two ways to increase your sales and two ways to reduce costs.

Bite Size Economics

The mission of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) is to make markets for consumer financial products and services, such as banking and credit, work for Americans. Research the CFPB at: www.consumerfinance.gov/regulations. Choose a regulation and share whether or not you think it is beneficial for businesses as well as consumers.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss what everyday life would be like if there was no money in circulation and we had to barter to get what we needed and wanted. Write a creative story with the title "Moneyless" to show the problems that might result.

Bite Size Economics

Give students a sample budget of expenses for a family. Have them identify the fixed expenses (the same amount monthly) and the variable expenses (a changing amount monthly). Ask students to draw sentences out of a hat representing events that might change a monthly budget, such as buying holiday gifts or fixing a flat tire. Have the students identify whether the expense is fixed or variable and then modify the budget to incorporate the added expense.

Bite Size Economics

Compare the unit price, or cost per item, of products. To find unit price, divide the price by the number of pieces, ounces or pounds. What would be the unit price for a 20 pound bag of dog food priced at $15? ($.75 per pound)

Bite Size Economics

Examine samples of foreign currency by going to: www.clevelandfed.org/Learning_Center/Online_Activities/explore_money/index.cfm. Compare bill features for three chosen countries. How are these notes similar? How are they different? What are some basic features that are common to all currency studied?

Bite Size Economics

Learn about online banking by becoming a quiz show participant in the Kansas City Fed's role play To Pay the Price. http://bit.ly/ZT730u

Bite Size Economics

Track expenses for a week and then create a spending plan to make sure your expenses don't exceed your income.

Bite Size Economics

Many supermarkets have non-food services such as floral departments, pharmacies, banks, dry cleaning and DVD rentals. Why do you think supermarkets offer these additional services?

Bite Size Economics

If a company produced 10 items at $7 per item and sold all 10 at $8.50 each, what is the profit for the producer? (10 x $1.50 = $15)

Bite Size Economics

Discuss how commercials influence what consumers buy. Ask students to give examples of commercials that convinced them to buy a product. Were they happy or disappointed with the purchases? Tell them to give reasons for their answers.

Bite Size Economics

Read Meet Kit: An American Girl by Valerie Tripp. Use the children's literature lesson from the St. Louis Fed to role play the effect that unemployment and reduced spending can have onpeople's lives during a recession. http://bit.ly/12Bxppn

Bite Size Economics

Why have other countries adopted mobile payments faster than the United States? Find out in the Atlanta Fed's podcast The Future of Mobile Payments. Write a description of a mobile payment option you think would work best in United States. http://bit.ly/11YTIOu

Bite Size Economics

Discuss fixed budget expenses (costs that remain the same) and variable expenses (costs that change). Write and perform a skit about college students living on campus who deal with these expenses.

Bite Size Economics

Learn more about the importance of credit score by watching "The Drawing Board: your Credit Score" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DWa34pB3pQA&feature=player_embedded.

Bite Size Economics

Imagine two people: one who has access to credit, and one who does not. Discuss the advantages of having access to credit and the barriers of non-access to credit and how it might shape each individual's future as his or her life unfolds.

Bite Size Economics

Explain the meaning of the following quote: "Our necessities never equal our wants." - Benjamin Franklin

Bite Size Economics

Introduce counterfeit money ("fake currency") as the major reason bills have been redesigned. Look at a real note online: www.newmoney.gov/currency/20.htm. Identify security measures placed on new U.S. currency including color, watermarks and micro-printing.

Bite Size Economics

Use a graphic organizer to show how the price of gas varies from your state to several neighboring states. How can the same gallon of gas from the same distributor, such as Shell or Phillips, differ in price from one state to the next?

Bite Size Economics

Discuss this quote: "America's support for human rights and democracy is our noblest export to the world." - William Bennett

Bite Size Economics

Watch the Economic Lowdown video on equilibrium at: http://www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/podcasts/economic_lowdown_video_3.cfm. How do the concepts of surplus and shortage relate to market equilibrium?

Bite Size Economics

Draw a picture showing how a scarcity of natural resources can affect your daily life.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss the difference between fixed expenses (those costs that do not change) and variable expenses (those costs that can change). Ask students to interview a parent to discover what fixed and variable expenses they pay monthly. Report findings to the class.

Bite Size Economics

Read The Goat in the Rug by Charles Blook and Martin Link. Use the children's literature lesson to discuss the topic of resources in the story: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/GoatintheRug.pdf

Bite Size Economics

Many students think about running their own business as adults. Ask students to brainstorm types of businesses that interest them. Invite a local business owner from an area of interest to speak to the class about his/her experiences. Prepare for the speaker by making a list of interview questions related to running a business.

Bite Size Economics

The threat of war pushed the Federal Reserve Banks to open early because of bank panic fears. How else can war affect the economic health of a country?

Bite Size Economics

The following statements are common descriptions of credit. Discuss each example and use one as a topic for a creative story.Credit is your reputation for financial responsibility.Credit is the time allowed for payment for something sold on trust.Credit is a source of revenue for financial institutions.Credit is NOT more money; it is "tomorrow's" money.

Bite Size Economics

Review the story of the Three Little Pigs. Do a cost/benefit analysis to compare their houses of straw, sticks and bricks in terms of materials, labor, cost and effectiveness.

Bite Size Economics

The American economic system has tax laws that influence people's behavior. For example, a sales tax increase at restaurants might influence people to stop eating out. Write an essay on how a response to tax increases could have future consequences for businesses.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss the exchange rate of currency as the ratio at which a unit of currency in one country can be exchanged for that of another country. Research the exchange rate for bills from five countries by going to: www.xe.com and using the exchange rate calculator. Which notes were worth more than the American dollar? Which were worth less? Why do you think one country's currency is valued higher than another?

Bite Size Economics

Your credit report is like a report card. It is used to calculate your credit score. You can receive one free credit report every twelve months from each of the nationwide credit bureaus-Equifax, Experian, and Transunion-by visiting www.annualcreditreport.com.

Bite Size Economics

Add together all the bill denominations currently in circulation. What is your dollar total? ($1+$2+$5+$10+$20+$50+$100=$188)

Bite Size Economics

Ask the class to brainstorm ways they could spend $10. List ideas and ask them to narrow it down to one, since the class has only one $10 bill. When there is disagreement on which one, discuss that the scarcity of the money to be spent forces us to make choices.

Bite Size Economics

Use handout 3 from lesson 4 of Building Wealth in the Classroom from the Dallas Fed to compare the interest rate, fees and additional information on five account types from a local bank. Share your findings. Once everyone shares, discuss the account and bank you would select. http://bit.ly/18kHBE4

Bite Size Economics

Some areas routinely experience water shortages. List the ways you use water every day. How could you cut down your usage or recycle water to help reduce water shortages? Create a public service announcement featuring your water saving ideas.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss this quote: "Information is the currency of democracy." - Thomas Jefferson

Bite Size Economics

Research and list the components of GDP by expenditure. What is the largest component of U.S. GDP? (consumption)

Bite Size Economics

Discuss this quote: "No one has a greater asset for his business than a man's pride in his work." - Hosea Ballou

Bite Size Economics

Make a collage of magazine ads that would appeal to consumers urging them to save money, possibly by living greener.

Bite Size Economics

View a short clip depicting a bank run from the movie, It's a Wonderful Life. Describe in a paragraph or two how depositors make poor decisions when they fear their bank is failing.

Bite Size Economics

Make a list of incentives that would persuade you to complete the task of cleaning your bedroom from top to bottom. Which of these incentives would your parents agree to?

Bite Size Economics

Hand out various grocery receipts to students with the sales tax blacked out. Discuss that some states tax only non-food items, while others tax both food and non-food. Have students calculate the sales tax for both situations.

Bite Size Economics

Trivia: Eldercare services are predicted to be one of the most profitable business opportunities in 2012-2013 due to a boom in the elderly population and longer overall life spans.

Bite Size Economics

Brainstorm types of financial emergencies (car break-downs, medical problems, home repairs, etc.). Discuss why it is important to have an emergency fund for unexpected expenses.

Bite Size Economics

Read Free Enterprise: The Economics of Cooperation, available at www.dallasfed.org/educate/classroom.cfm, to learn about the role of businesses in a free-enterprise system.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss Halloween and the practice of "trick-or-treating." Would this holiday be as much fun if the incentive of candy wasn't given out to trick or treaters? Would you still want to "trick-or-treat?" The "treat" can influence the behavior of kids. Take a survey to decide which type of treat is the best incentive: chocolate bars, fruit-flavored candy, gum and other choices.

Bite Size Economics

Currency is produced by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, located in Washington, D.C. and Fort Worth, Texas. Look at the new $100 bill at www.newmoney.gov/currency/default.htm. Examine the interactive $100 note and take the quiz on its features.

Bite Size Economics

Play a game of musical chairs or a game where there is not enough gym equipment for all players. Discuss how the lack of chairs or equipment makes the game more difficult. Scarcity forces us to make choices or decisions.

Bite Size Economics

Discover what it takes to be a bank examiner at the Federal Reserve by reviewing an examiner job description from the Kansas City Fed. What are the three college degrees recommended for a bank examiner? http://bit.ly/18lWMKo

Bite Size Economics

Use the lesson plan and role play "Professor Finance and Fed Boy Meet the Catastrophe Clan" to discuss the uses and misuses of credit: http://kansascityfed.org/publicat/education/teachingresources/fed_boy_lesson_plan.pdf

Bite Size Economics

Discuss counterfeit currency and how it has become more prevalent in the U.S. over the years due to technological advancements. Explain how security measures have been added to U.S. bills to thwart counterfeiters, and look at some of these features at: www.newmoney.gov/currency/default.htm. Ask a speaker from a bank to speak to the class on detecting counterfeit currency.

Bite Size Economics

Research the purposes of the World Trade Organization (WTO). Hold a mock debate where two countries use the WTO as a forum to discuss their disagreements concerning a trade policy.

Bite Size Economics

Brainstorm a class list of typical weekly expenses and add the estimated costs. Find ways to cut expenses and add the new estimated costs. Subtract the new total from the original one to discover how much money can now be saved.

Bite Size Economics

Play 20 Econ Questions or Econ Word Wiz (www.federalreserveeducation.org/resources/fiftynifty) using "producer" as one of the words.

Bite Size Economics

In preparation for homecoming, identify what is needed for the event. Then divide the list of items into goods and services. Rank the list in order of importance to you. What goods and services could you give up if you were on a limited budget?

Bite Size Economics

Look at the Federal Trade Commission's website: www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/pubs/consumer/credit/cre34.shtm to learn about the Fair Credit Reporting Act. Discuss why consumers should order a copy of their credit report yearly.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss how businesses invest in capital resources, such as newer computers, machines and technology. How can spending money on these resources lead to profits in the long term?

Bite Size Economics

Discuss the meaning of this quote: "An opportunity cost is an opportunity lost."

Bite Size Economics

Interview family members or neighbors about the recent recession and any changes or effects it had on their lifestyles. Report your findings to the class.

Bite Size Economics

Your school had a pancake breakfast to raise funds for the sports teams. Expenses included paying for food and set-up costs, which were $949. The number of dinners sold was 275 at $6.00 each. What was the total income from the event? What was the profit after expenses? ($1650; $701)

Bite Size Economics

You are a producer of a new and unique athletic shoe. Develop a poster or commercial to advertise your amazing shoe.

Bite Size Economics

Another name for the Bank Panic of 1907 was the Knickerbocker Crisis.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss the growing threat of identity theft. Ask students to write tips for consumers to follow in keeping their identity safe. (Example: Memorize your Social Security number so you won't need to carry your card with you.)

Bite Size Economics

Research Mattel, Hasbro or other toy companies to see how they determine what toys to produce and supply to retail stores. Use the information you find to predict what toys might be popular in 2020.

Bite Size Economics

Examine currency from other countries and see what it can reveal about their culture and economy with the Cleveland Fed's Explore Money from Around the World online activity. http://bit.ly/11MDk3I

Bite Size Economics

Money doesn't grow on trees, but it can grow. Watch No Frills Money Skills episode 1 from the St. Louis Fed. Develop a table showing how saving $1,000 at 3% annual interest can compound your savings over a 6-year period. http://bit.ly/11OJ5Pt

Bite Size Economics

Currency is printed at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing (in Washington, DC or Fort Worth, TX) and then shipped to the Federal Reserve for distribution to local banks when needed. Find these locations and the Federal Reserve office closest to you on a U.S. map.

Bite Size Economics

Watch the Economic Lowdown video on demand at: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/podcasts/economic_lowdown_video_2.cfm. Take notes on the six ways demand can change, giving an example for each. Create and present a skit showing the effects of supply and demand on the purchase of the newest cell phone, tablet or electronic device.

Bite Size Economics

Create a skit in small groups about possible financial situations at age 65 (i.e., no savings vs. wealthy investor). Discuss possible actions that can lead to financial security in retirement.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss that many economic scenarios can cause either a shortage or surplus of used cars. Ask students to brainstorm situations where a used car shortage might develop and where a used car surplus might develop. If you were a used car dealer, what would you do to avoid a large surplus or shortage?

Bite Size Economics

Discuss the costs and benefits, both monetary and nonmonetary, of having a public school system. Research what it costs taxpayers per year for a student to attend public school, using your state department of education website. What are the benefits of public education? Arethere any costs? What are the benefits to taxpayers that make themwilling to share the costs? Write a brief essay explaining your ideas.

Bite Size Economics

Pick a local publicly traded company. Research the goods and services that the company produces and sells, and create a four-slide minimum PowerPoint illustrating the company and what it does.

Bite Size Economics

Visit the Federal Reserve Board of Governor's website to find tips for improving your credit score. Make a poster to share this information with your classmates. http://1.usa.gov/140Qjnb

Bite Size Economics

Create an invention or innovation that would make life easier. Name and describe your invention. What price would you sell it for? What would your income be if you sold 100? 250? 500?

Bite Size Economics

Use the FDIC's EDIE the Estimator tool to explore how FDIC insurance protects depositors. Try the simulator using varying deposit balances to determine the FDIC coverage limit for a single account. Check your answer by reviewing the page's Deposit Insurance FAQs. http://1.usa.gov/YVeeTe

Bite Size Economics

Credit card bills now provide an estimate of how long it will take to pay off a balance making only the minimum payment. Paying more than the minimum can substantially decrease the total amount of the purchase. Discover the savings using the credit card repayment calculator at www.federalreserve.gov/creditcardcalculator.

Bite Size Economics

Change the lyrics of a popular song so that they now convince someone to keep their liabilities low for better financial health.

Bite Size Economics

You have opened a new video game store and hired five full-time employees. If starting salaries are $8.50 an hour and all employees work a 40-hour week, how much should you budget for employee salaries weekly? ($1,700)

Bite Size Economics

Bank XYZ is examined and scored every year to make sure it is following banking rules as a safe and sound place for your money. The last four scores were 3, 2, 2 and 1. What is the average score of Bank XYZ? (Answer: 2)

Bite Size Economics

Write about the problem that occurs when people do not recycle resources and the resulting opportunity cost on the environment.

Bite Size Economics

Have students list all the extra-curricular activities they could participate in for the first semester, including sports, clubs and competitions. Discuss that scarcity of time forces them to choose between several activities they may be interested in.

Bite Size Economics

Debate this topic: "The benefits of making financial mistakes outweigh the costs."

Bite Size Economics

Just for fun, try saying this tongue twister quickly three times: Skyler scored the scarce scholarship.

Bite Size Economics

Gas prices are $3.29 a gallon and then increase to $3.69 a gallon due to a shortage. How much would 18 gallons of gas cost at each price? ($59.22; $66.42) How much would you save if you purchased gas at the lower price? ($7.20)

Bite Size Economics

Discuss the meaning of the following quote: "Budget: a mathematical confirmation of your suspicions." - A.A. Latime

Bite Size Economics

Draw pictures that represent financial words and write the definitions of the words on the opposite side. Save these financial flashcards to use for review. Suggested words: bank, save, deposit, withdrawal, interest, emergency fund, short-term goal, long-term goal.

Bite Size Economics

Use the above activity to develop small group businesses with four to five students. Each group should decide on their product, follow the production steps and sell the products to classmates using fake money. Students may choose to incorporate marketing techniques to increase sales. Groups should give a final business report, noting profit/loss, to the class.

Bite Size Economics

Have students draw a picture of their perfect vacation spot and include as many natural resources as possible.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss homecoming expense choices and opportunity costs. For example, with a limited amount of money, would you choose a fancy limo for transportation? Would you spend more money for a high-dollar outfit instead? Or would you spend your dollars on an expensive restaurant meal before the dance? Discuss the reasoning behind your decisions.

Bite Size Economics

Use the limerick below to introduce surpluses and shortages. Ask students to make up their own poem about surpluses and shortages to share. There once was a price just too high,So that no one would bother to buy.On the shelf the stuff sat,Gathered dust like a floor mat.A surplus needs a lower price-that's why! And then there was a price oh so low,That folks stood in a long line, oh no!But the shelves were soon bare,Those still waiting sure cared.A higher price would have solvedtheir shortage woes.

Bite Size Economics

Visit a local bank or credit union and ask for some deposit slips. Use addition and subtraction and place value to practice filling out the slips

Bite Size Economics

Discuss famous entrepreneurs that students are familiar with, such as Bill Gates, Oprah Winfrey, Walt Disney and J.K. Rowling. Look at: www.thelittlee.com/html/famous_entrepreneurs.html and ask students to choose one entrepreneur they are impressed with to research and share with the class.

Bite Size Economics

Think of people at school who are producers. One example might be cafeteria workers who produce breakfast and lunch for students. Others could be a custodian, principal, administrative assistant or any teacher. Make a list of these producers and the goods or services they offer. Ask each student to write a thank-you note to one of these producers.

Bite Size Economics

Taylor purchased candy bars from the store at 50 cents each. She wants to sell them at school after lunch for $1 each. From what you've learned about supply and demand, what advice would you give Taylor regarding her price?

Bite Size Economics

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, or FDIC, insures bank accounts up to $250,000 per account holder. What part of $1,000,000 is $250,000? (answer: one fourth or 25%)

Bite Size Economics

Read Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder to learn about factors of production, which can lead to economic growth. Draw a flow chart that shows the inputs (productive resources) necessary to create chocolate chip cookies (outputs). http://bit.ly/120lmuN

Bite Size Economics

Brainstorm the skills and knowledge that will be needed in the future to work as a bank teller. Write a job posting that might be used by a local bank describing the characteristics that banks will be looking for when hiring tellers.

Bite Size Economics

Imagine your school district does not have enough money in its budget to provide all the services necessary to run your local schools. Assuming the role of the president of the school board, brainstorm a list of all the benefits of a tax increase. Then consider the perspective of a taxpayer against the increase and make a list of the monetary costs. Use the lists for a classroom debate on the topic.

Bite Size Economics

Review the credit scenarios from the Dallas Fed's Building Wealth in the Classroom, Lesson 9. Choose one and decide whether the teen described should borrow money. Write a short persuasive essay with reasons to support your answer. http://bit.ly/10IsJHM

Bite Size Economics

Create a collage using magazine pictures of items you'd like to purchase in the future. Narrow your choices to two favorites. What would your final choice/opportunity cost be?

Bite Size Economics

Draw a cartoon to portray one of the following label instructions found on consumer goods: hairdryer-never use while sleeping; iron-do not iron clothes on body; child's costume-cape does not enable user to fly.

Bite Size Economics

Brainstorm a list of careers or jobs that are associated with taxes (such as accountant). Research one of these careers to learn about the education qualifications, income level and demand for the job.

Bite Size Economics

When you deposit a $5 bill in the bank, will you ever see that exact $5 bill again? Draw a comic strip that shows what happens to the bill that you deposit.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss what economists mean when they say, "There is no such thing as a free lunch." How does this quotation relate to costs and benefits?

Bite Size Economics

Read the original Federal Reserve Act, signed Dec. 23, 1913. Write down four key facts about the founding of the Federal Reserve System from the primary source document, available from the Librarians' Society of Washington, D.C. http://bit.ly/18qbUEL.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss the fact that $5, $10, $20, $50 and $100 bills have all been redesigned by the Treasury and will be updated again in the future. What is the incentive for our government to do this redesigning?

Bite Size Economics

Use the lesson plan and role play for "Payment Parliament" to teach students about the many ways we pay for goods and services: www.kansascityfed.org/publicat/education/teachingresources/Payment%20Parliament.pdf.

Bite Size Economics

Introduce the economic meanings of cost and benefit. Discuss that both are not always money-related, using the example of the costs and benefits of doing homework. Have students brainstorm a list of costs (losses) and benefits (gains) they experience by doing their homework. Take a vote to decide if the costs outweigh the benefits or vice versa.

Bite Size Economics

Read So Few of Me by Peter Reynolds. Use the children's literature lesson to discuss the topic of opportunity cost in the story: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/SoFewOfMe.pdf.

Bite Size Economics

Learn about the sectors of the Federal Reserve's Beige Book in the lesson Exploring Economic Sectors, available at: www.kansascityfed.org/publicat/education/teachingresources/Exploring-Economic-Sectors.pdf. Use the discussion questions provided for each sector to explore the concepts of supply and demand.

Bite Size Economics

What does money mean to you? Purchasing power? Security? Freedom? Brainstorm ideas and then create a collage showing what money can represent.

Bite Size Economics

Gather pictures from magazine, local newspaper articles, chamber of commerce promotional material, etc., and create individual or group collages that represent the economy of theregion where you live. Be sure to include the natural, human and capital resources of your area.

Bite Size Economics

Ask students to choose a class business that might be successful in their school, such as a craft, food or entertainment business. Create a business plan, including the following: resources needed, production process, product display, advertising, pricing and labor schedule. Present the plan to your principal for approval.

Bite Size Economics

Become better informed about payment cards from the Philadelphia Fed's resource What You Need to Know about Payment Cards. Design a poster showing the advantages and disadvantages of the three main types of payment cards. http://bit.ly/18D0HGm

Bite Size Economics

Trade barriers are costs that raise the price of traded products. Examples are tariffs, import and export quotas, and embargoes. In groups, research and make charts to compare and contrast these barriers.

Bite Size Economics

Read Supermarket by Kathleen Krull. Use the children's literature lesson to discuss how technology has changed markets: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/supermarket.pdf

Bite Size Economics

Become a board member of a Federal Reserve Bank and learn about the Fed's grassroots approach to gathering regional economic information in the Atlanta Fed's simulation Monetary Policy Starts in Your Own Backyard. http://bit.ly/ZNti2r

Bite Size Economics

Look carefully at a picture of a $10 bill. Identify the following features that make the bill legal currency: denomination amount; presidential portrait; serial numbers; Federal Reserve and Treasury seals; important signature. Ask students to look for additional features and discuss.

Bite Size Economics

Research and record the population of five different cities or communities within your region. Develop a bar graph to compare the population results. Discuss how the population of an area can affect its economy, in terms of jobs and housing.

Bite Size Economics

Before buying clothes or shoes, consumers should consider several features, such as price, quality, fit, style and comfort. Discuss and rank these features with students to see which ones are most important to them in making a purchasing decision.

Bite Size Economics

If U.S. exports to China are worth $8 billion, and U.S. imports from China are worth $34 billion, what is the total trade amount? ($42 billion) What is the trade deficit? ($26 billion)

Bite Size Economics

How do high levels of employment affect economic growth?

Bite Size Economics

Why are federal laws necessary to protect the civil rights of consumers?

Bite Size Economics

Research the meaning of marginal cost and marginal benefit. Businesses think on the margin, deciding whether the benefit of producing one more unit would be greater than or less than the cost. Share an example of this marginal cost/benefit situation from your research.

Bite Size Economics

Opportunity cost is the next best choice given up when making a decision. Write and perform a skit where the main character makes a decision on whether to take a part-time job. Make sure to include the opportunity cost.

Bite Size Economics

Jay Eagle from the Kansas City Fed is flying throughout the Tenth District. Learn more about Jay and how to have him visit your classroom at jay.kcfed.org.

Bite Size Economics

Use the school cafeteria as an example of a business that provides goods and services. Tell students that goods are things that satisfy wants, such as food and utensils. Services are activities that satisfy wants, such as cooking the food and cleaning the cafeteria. Ask students to draw cafeteria foods or other goods on one side of art paper and activities or services on the other side.

Bite Size Economics

Read Saturday Sancocho by Leyla Torres. Use the children's literature lesson to discuss the topic of bartering as a form of trade: www.stlouisfed.org/education_resources/assets/lesson_plans/SaturdaySancocho.pdf

Bite Size Economics

Many entrepreneurs get their start through designing an invention or innovation that becomes successful. Research famous inventors by looking at: www.ideafinder.com/articles/thelists/entrepreneur.htm. As a group, vote on the top three inventors based on their creativity and success.

Bite Size Economics

Brainstorm ways students can earn income and make a chart of ideas. (Examples: allowance, chores, birthday/holiday gifts, garage sales, etc.) Ask students to set future savings goals (for things they will spend their income on) and share with the class.

Bite Size Economics

Which is greater: $1 million, or a penny that doubles in value for 30 days? Use a calculator to figure out the compound interest of the doubling penny by taking each new total and multiplying by 2 to double. (The final total for the doubling penny is $5,368,709.12)

Bite Size Economics

Compose a song or a rap about being a "savvy shopper." Include verses about comparison shopping, purchasing quality vs. quantity, and avoiding buyer's remorse.

Bite Size Economics

Discuss this quote: "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself". - Franklin D. Roosevelt. How could these words relate to bank panics?

Bite Size Economics

Find auto loan 36-month interest rates for a used car from three banks. Record the rates and any additional fees or conditions from each bank. Discuss which bank you would choose to finance your car loan and give reasons why.