Katharine W. Winograd



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As president of Central New Mexico Community College in Albuquerque, N.M., Katharine Winograd must ensure the college is offering the kind of programs that prepare students for the current and future workforce.

She accomplishes this large task by working with various partners and economic leaders in the community.

“On a daily basis, I’m working to develop new ways that our community college can positively impact economic development in New Mexico,” she said.

Central New Mexico has the largest undergraduate student body in New Mexico, with 25,000 credited students, about 4,000 noncredited students and a College and Career High School.

In 2014, the U.S. Department of Education ranked Central New Mexico No. 2 among 1,100 U.S. community colleges for the number of associate degrees earned by Hispanics and Native Americans in the 2012- 13 academic year.

Winograd says being a leader in education and job training will remain Central New Mexico’s top priority. But just as important is the college’s focus to support students and help more of them graduate, which leads to a better future for the students and their families.

“In the bigger picture, we are trying to produce higher numbers of graduates in order to bolster the quality of our state’s workforce,” Winograd said.

This is important because New Mexico’s economy is still struggling after the Great Recession, she says.

As a director on the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City’s Denver Branch Board, Winograd wants to emphasize the importance of considering education issues when planning major economic and policy decisions.

“To improve our economy, we also have to improve our public education system,” she said.

Because the college’s role is to develop an effective and efficient workforce for New Mexico, Winograd has the opportunity to be involved in many conversations and strategic efforts related to economic issues in the state. The conversations about economic development in New Mexico and throughout the country continue to focus on workforce needs.

“I am excited about the opportunity to have deeper discussions with my colleagues in New Mexico about our economic outlook,” she said. “I look forward to sharing those perspectives with the Denver Board, as well as learning more about how these perspectives influence the formulation of comprehensive monetary policies.”