Tradition of Women



Our Reserve Bank’s commitment to diversity is evident from our early beginnings. From this strong foundation, we continue to expand and enhance our efforts.

Historical Timeline

1914: The Federal Reserve opens with five female employees out of 15 total. They earned an average of $60 month as stenograph operators.

1935: The Kansas City Fed implements a ban on hiring married women, which is repealed years later.

1971: Donna Simpson is named the Reserve Bank's first female examiner.

1971: Virginia Sutton is named the Reserve Bank's first female auditor.

1973: Betty Dixon is the first female protection officer. She was hired at the Kansas City Fed's Omaha Branch.

1973: The Denver Branch hires Candy Ferguson as its first female protection officer.

1978: The Oklahoma City Branch hires Lou Wallace as its first female protection officer.

1979: The Kansas City headquarters office hires Leslie Bowden as its first female protection officer.

1982: The first two women employees are promoted to the Kansas City Fed's official staff: Kathy Webster and Barbara Saathoff.

1984: Doris Drury becomes the first chairman of the Reserve Bank's Board of Directors.

1994: Julie Stackhouse is named as the first female senior vice president.

2000: The four Boards of Directors are all chaired by women: Jo Marie Dancik in Kansas City, Kathryn Paul in Denver, Gladys Styles Johnston in Omaha and Patricia Fennell in Oklahoma City.

2001: Maryann Hunter at the Denver Branch is the first female to become manager of one of the three Branch offices.

2009: Esther George is the first woman named First Vice President and Chief Operating Officer.

2010: The Office of Minority and Women Inclusion is created to oversee diversity practices. Donna Ward is named director.

2011: Esther George is the first woman named President and Chief Executive Officer.